Tuesday, 16 January 2018

This weekend we offer a double bill of weekend videos. A guided walk through Point Pleasant Park in Halifax by Tuma Young, who shows some of the traditional Mi’kmaq medicines there for the picking. Then we turn up the sweetness level all the way to 11 in a video produced by a very young Mya Denny, as she hangs out with her grandfather Joel Denny while he gathers medicine in the woods,

With some footage of Mi’kmaw poet and elder Rita Joe herself, we are delighted to present this wonderful musical interpretation by students of the Allison Bernard Memorial High School in Eskasoni of what is probably Rita Joe’s best known poem, I lost my talk.

A moving story obout a four-year old little girl at the Shubenacadie Residential School and her doll, as remembered by Elder Elder Magit Sylliboy, and filmed by students of the We’koqom’a Mi’kmaw School in Waycobah, Cape Breton. A must see!

About eight hundred Nova Scotians marched to Province House because they hate the devastation of our forests caused by clearcutting and because bureaucrats and politicians aren’t listening to them. To mark this important event we offer up a handful of photos and a transcription of the remarks by Melissa Labrador, a Mi’kmaq woman of the Wildcat community near Kejimkujik.

This weekend we feature the wonderful Mi’kmaq multidisciplinary artist Ursula Johnson in no less than three short videos. Johnson was recently shortlisted as the Atlantic nominee for the Sobey Art Award, which is a pretty big deal. For us any excuse to feature these three short intriguing videos will do. Check it out!

In early May this year Mi’kmaq leader Keptin Sark returned the Order of PEI that he had been awarded to the provincial legislature. He wants the name of Jeffrey Amherst – a notorious British General responsible for distributing blankets infected with smallpox amongst the Mi’kmaq and other Indigenous peoples in the 18th Century – removed from the historic site at Port-la-Joye at Rocky Point, across the harbour from Charlottetown. Neither the provincial nor the federal Liberals are listening.

Michael McDonald, a Mi’kmaq of Sipekne’katik First Nations, offers up a fascinating version of the history of Kjipuktuk, or Halifax, that is quite different from the one we usually hear. For one thing, it starts way before Cornwallis arrived.

I had this weekend’s video all picked and ready to go. Something really good, but grim, bound to leave you angry. Well, I changed my mind. Instead we offer a big league beautiful documentary on Mi’kmaq artist Alan Syliboy as he paints his mural in the Halifax International Airport.