School has started, but it’s not too late for governments to listen to the experts (teachers, medical professionals, parents) and make plans to transition to smaller classes now before a second wave hits us and forces us to shut down schools entirely, writes Molly Hurd.

Joanne Bealy considers the state of the world and our province and issues a call to action. “We need people who don’t usually speak out to join those who do and for everybody to stand together for the good of all of us. It’s time to let it be known that the disenfranchisement of minority groups, intended or not, is not OK. One step forward, maybe two back, but on we go. We can have the country we want and deserve. It is our choice.”

Halifax Council’s intention to limit this year’s property tax increase to 1.9% will lead to a sizeable reduction in staff, Halifax head librarian and CEO Åsa Kachan told the Council’s budget committee on Friday. That inevitably means programs and services will be impacted, she said. Councillors will make a decision later this month. Maybe it’s time to give your councillor a call.

Danny Cavanagh tackles the myth that tax cuts for big corporations somehow benefit society. “Enough of the one-liners and quotations, and people buying into the agenda that taxes are too high. The fact is, the big business elite isn’t taxed enough. It’s time they ante up, stop tax avoidance in tax havens, and start to pay their fair share, both personally and for their big businesses.  Just like the rest of us.”

Educator Molly Hurd tackles the current threats to art education in Nova Scotia. “By reducing arts education, we are once again widening the gap between those who already have and those who have not. Rich parents will always be able to provide private lessons and classes for their children. Schools in wealthy neighbourhoods will always be able to fund-raise for extra artistic opportunities.  Public education, to be truly equitable, needs to provide good arts education for all.”