Thursday, 30 March 2017

This weekend we present Women of Substance, a documentary about women and addiction shot by director Nance Ackerman. As everything by Ackerman this short film is full of warmth and telling little details. “Everybody has the ability to stand up and say I am a person, I am not that addiction.”

This (very) short film by Halifax filmmaker Stephanie Young reminds us that being a trans woman, and especially a trans woman of colour, means you are at high risk of becoming targeted in violent hate crimes. When we talk about women’s issues, we should include trans women.

Kendall Worth investigates involuntary and so-called inappropriate body language, things like fidgeting in public, talking to yourself (in some cases out loud), making big hand movements that make a person look like they are trying to start a fight with someone, or engage in evil-looking facial expressions. He talks to middle and upper class people who don’t really understand, a police officer and the people who actually do those types of things.

Reporter Rebecca Hussman with the second part of her series on sexual assaults in Nova Scotia. “There’s a whole societal change that needs to happen for victims to feel believed and supported enough to be able to report that to police.”

According to data gathered by journalists at the Globe and Mail, of all cases in the country, 12% of sexual assault cases were cleared as unfounded from 2010 to 2014. In Nova Scotia, in contrast, 25% of sexual assault cases were cleared as unfounded. The “Unfounded” classification means that police determined that the reported violation did not happen. Reporter Rebecca Hussman talks with the chiefs of police of the Truro, Amherst and Bridgewater detachments where the number of unfounded cases is exceptionally high. And we compiled a list with data from all police detachments in Nova Scotia.