Martyn Williams: Seniors rely on walking or cycling for mobility because they may no longer drive for health reasons, or because it is the only way they can enjoy much needed exercise. But the infrastructure they use is built for vehicles to move quickly and easily, not to meet the safety requirements of vulnerable road users of all ages and abilities.

“The way that we’re looking at it, regardless of whether there’s four residents or 40 or 400, you’re taking children away from their families. What the press release says is that it will house children from two to 18 years old. No two year old should be removed from their family. No parent wants to have their child sent to live somewhere else, they will only agree when there are no alternatives provided, says Patricia Neves, Acting Executive Director of the Nova Scotia Association for Community Living.

Martyn Williams writes a letter to city staff and councillors to plea for safer intersections for old people and people who live with disabilities. “This is not an issue where engineers may balance the cost to vulnerable road user lives against the benefit gained to traffic flow. It is a human rights issue that requires urgent action and intervention by leadership through appropriate policy.”

In April of 1977 about a dozen men were thrown out of the Jury Room bar, on the corner of Argyle & Prince streets, for being gay. They fought back, and Rebecca Rose tells the story.

Today’s LGBTQ2S+ landmark is Forrest House, a.k.a. a Woman’s Place. Many lesbians and bisexual women were involved, though they didn’t always feel welcome, Rebecca Rose writes.

Rebecca Rose continues her virtual tour of historic LGBTQ2S+ Halifax with a look at Citadel Hill and other popular cruising spots in the sixties and seventies. “If the action fails, there’s always the view.”