Saturday, 23 March 2019

The trailer for Six Primose, a documentary about the Dartmouth North Community Food Centre and the dramatic impact that access to healthy food, a social network and empowering programs have had on individual lives and the community as a whole. See the entire film this Wednesday January 30, it’s free!

This weekend we present a short documentary produced by distinguished filmmaker, drummer, teacher and author Catherine Martin about the first Idle No More event in Nova Scotia, on December 14, 2012 at the Grand Parade across from City Hall in Halifax.   

Nova Scotia indie filmmaker Ann Verrall often makes movies and documentaries collaborating with youths , and she’s really good at it. What’s with that Treaty? is a great example. The video was made by students of We’koqma’q Mi’kmaq School in Cape Breton during a 5-day video intensive. Students document Treaty Day activities, Orange Shirt Day, meet with elders Joe Googoo, Magit Poulette, Ben Sylliboy, and Malglit Pelletier, and explore Treaty Education. Students also talk about the impact of residential school on them. 

This weekend we feature an interview with Ralph Wheadon, who became a Provincial Forest Ranger for the area above St. Margaret’s Bay in the early fifties. He talks about fighting forest fires, log drives down the Ingram River, and the changes (not for the better) he has witnessed over his long career. “”If we don’t have logs, if we don’t have timber, I worry about our watersheds. And I am really concerned, as  a lot of people are, about cutting that biomass stuff down…”  

This weekend’s Weekend Video, Me too: From hashtags to healing, features some of the expert sexual assault trauma therapists who work for the Avalon Sexual Assault Centre, talking about their backgrounds and the very important work they do. 

In 1965, prior to the construction of the Boat Harbour treatment facility, the Nova Scotia Water Authority, representing the provincial government, assured upset members of the Pictou Landing First Nation that the lagoon would remain suitable for boating, and even that fresh-water fish could be introduced. The only time there would be a bit of a smell would be in spring as the ice in the lagoon was breaking up, community members were told.

Two clips this weekend, to highlight two film festivals happening this week, one a mini one, the other a full blown festival, and both with an excellent line up. Kampung Tapir, a 17-minute short from Indonesia/Malaysia about migration, is part of this Tuesday’s screening presented by Mayworks’ Canadian Labour International Film Festival. Next we present a trailer for the full length Singing to Myself, about a young deaf woman living in Prince Edward Island and the precocious musician who comes into her life. That is one of the many gems offered by the Bluenose-Ability Film Festival, running from November 29 to December 3rd.