Monday, 24 September 2018

Weekend video: Meet Dave, a resident of Nova Scotia’s South Shore, as he talks about the PTSD that he lives with, and his inability to find proper help. “And yet I sit here, through no fault of my own, in a position I can’t control. And when I ask for help, there is nobody listening.”

Weekend video: Over five years, acclaimed filmmaker Andrea Dorfman follows the heartbreaking yet uplifting story of the girls of Meru and their brave steps toward meaningful equality for girls worldwide. In Kenya, one in three girls will experience sexual violence before age 18, yet police investigations are the exception.

See the entire documentary on Sunday afternoon, at FIN, or whatever they call the film festival these days.

This weekend’s video is a short and sweet CBC news report by Elizabeth McMillan on two Mi’kmaq teens from the community of L’sitkuk, Bear River First Nation, who are getting an opportunity to work in Kejimkujik National Park with Todd Labrador. Labrador is one of the few people in Canada still making traditional birchbark canoes. Also, a portion of a longer interview with Labrador by Silver Donald Cameron.

This weekend’s video features Rupesh, Praise, and Marwa, three youth who came to Nova Scotia as refugees and share their experiences on camera. It’s very nice.

This weekend’s weekend video is Etlinisigu’niet (Bleed Down), by Mi’kmaq filmmaker Jeff Barnaby. its theme is the violent destruction of indigenous identity in Canada by white settler culture. It’s quite terrifying to watch.

Meet Melissa King, who with her husband bought a modest house in Harrietsfield to raise her family. The previous owner claimed the water was fine, and promptly left the country. Now King tells us how contaminated water forced the family to abandon their hopes and dreams and declare bankruptcy just so her family could start all over somewhere else. The video is part of the CBC documentary Defenders of the Dawn: Green Rights in the Maritimes, by Silver Donald Cameron.

Sure it’s Monday, but stuff happened over the weekend, and we’re running a bit late. Didn’t want to miss an opportunity to put a plug in for this year’s Mayworks Festival, which starts tomorrow .

Nova Scotia’s George Dixon was what you call a trailblazer. First Black boxing champion, period. First champ to regain his title after losing it. First person to be champion of more than one weight class. We’re talking late 1800s, early 1900s, a time of relentless racism. Here’s a video of one of his fights, and a bonus link to a wonderful website with everything Africvile.