Tuesday, 20 November 2018

This weekend’s weekend video features Halifax musician, photographer, stalwart activist and Nova Scotia Advocate author Paul Vienneau as he hands out bottled water on a hot Spring Garden day. ““This helped me see that giving away water has become part of what I am doing with my life. It’s an antidepressant in 24 little plastic bottles.”

Recent King’s journalism graduates Tundé Balogun and  Sandra Hannebohm want to cover news that traditional media in Nova Scotia overlook. To do so, they have founded the Objective, an independent news agency that will cover Black news in Nova Scotia and beyond. Check out the trailer for their first project, a work in progress about the school-to-prison pipeline for Black kids here in Nova Scotia. Please support Tundé and Sandra and help them finish the documentary. It’s important.

Just last week it was announced that the AGNS acquired kent Monkman’s large painting, Miss Chief’s Wet Dream, featuring Jesus Christ, Queen Victoria, Marie Antoinette, as well as Miss Chief Testickle, Monkman’s gender-fluid alter ego. This weekend’s video celebrates that acquisition, and I also use it to plug the wonderful Monkman exhibition up now, and running til mid-December, and especially also a collective viewing this Thursday evening organized by MLA Lisa Roberts. Thursday nights are free at the AGNS.

Check out this weekend’s Weekend video, We story the land, a documentary by the always excellent Martha Stiegman (and co-produced and directed by Sherry Pictou) that follows seven paddlers from L’sitkuk (Bear River First Nation) as they travel inland following almost forgotten traditional Mi’kmaq canoe routes. It’s really good.

Everything you should know about gold mining in Nova Scotia, the harm it does to the environment and the politicians who make it all possible, in this very good documentary by Cliff Seruntine.

This weekend’s weekend video is Missing Women”, based on a stunning poem by Mad poet and filmmaker Anna Quon. The poem lists some of the ways women have gone missing from history, culture and their own lives, and names some of those women and girls to help us remember them. You really should watch this.

Weekend video: Meet Dave, a resident of Nova Scotia’s South Shore, as he talks about the PTSD that he lives with, and his inability to find proper help. “And yet I sit here, through no fault of my own, in a position I can’t control. And when I ask for help, there is nobody listening.”

Weekend video: Over five years, acclaimed filmmaker Andrea Dorfman follows the heartbreaking yet uplifting story of the girls of Meru and their brave steps toward meaningful equality for girls worldwide. In Kenya, one in three girls will experience sexual violence before age 18, yet police investigations are the exception.

See the entire documentary on Sunday afternoon, at FIN, or whatever they call the film festival these days.

This weekend’s video is a short and sweet CBC news report by Elizabeth McMillan on two Mi’kmaq teens from the community of L’sitkuk, Bear River First Nation, who are getting an opportunity to work in Kejimkujik National Park with Todd Labrador. Labrador is one of the few people in Canada still making traditional birchbark canoes. Also, a portion of a longer interview with Labrador by Silver Donald Cameron.

This weekend’s video features Rupesh, Praise, and Marwa, three youth who came to Nova Scotia as refugees and share their experiences on camera. It’s very nice.