Sunday, 23 July 2017

This weekend video actually started as a story published in the Nova Scotia Advocate, written by a mother who wanted to tell how being on welfare affected her and her children, the stigma she faced, and how it can happen to anyone.

Earlier this year the Nova Scotia Advocate was proud and excited to publish El Jones’ We will stop Alton Gas, right after her reading at a  fundraiser for the fearless Alton Gas resisters. Now we bring you Stop Alton Gas, the movie, spoken by El Jones, wonderfully animated by Rachel Derrah and filmed by Izrael Media Arts. Check it out!

This weekend we feature a trailer for a movie written and directed by the wonderfully talented Cory Bowles. It’s about a Black cop who gets profiled while off duty. I really want to see it. Thing is, the movie isn’t quite done yet, and Bowles needs our help. So check it out, and, if you have a bit of money to spare, hurry on to the Indiegogo site to do your civic duty.

In this powerful video Nova Scotians who know about welfare first hand are asked to describe Income Assistance in three words. It takes them all of 49 seconds to tell us that social assistance in Nova Scotia is broken.

This week’s brand new weekend video shows highlights from the recent town hall tour organized by a coalition of individuals and groups opposed to the Alton Gas development. It seems only shareholders and politicians are in favour of the Alton Gas project. Everybody else, not so much.

A former member of the Dr. Ingrid Waldron’s Enrich project talks about growing up poor, becoming aware of white privilege, and the need to fight alongside communities in Nova Scotia who face environmental racism, all in the plainest of language.

This weekend we present Women of Substance, a documentary about women and addiction shot by director Nance Ackerman. As everything by Ackerman this short film is full of warmth and telling little details. “Everybody has the ability to stand up and say I am a person, I am not that addiction.”

This weekend’s featured video is The Skin We’re In, by Desmond Cole and Charles Officer. A documentary about carding and profiling and racism by a Toronto journalist, but with a surprising amount of Nova Scotia content.