Tuesday, 21 November 2017

This weekend we feature In the shadow of the dam, APTN’s brand new and excellent documentary on the indigenous resistance to the Muskrat Falls project in Labrador. You can’t condemn environmental racism and violation of Indigenous rights in Nova Scotia, and remain silent on what’s happening in Labrador right now. It’s that simple.

With some footage of Mi’kmaw poet and elder Rita Joe herself, we are delighted to present this wonderful musical interpretation by students of the Allison Bernard Memorial High School in Eskasoni of what is probably Rita Joe’s best known poem, I lost my talk.

Meet Elaine Cain, a North Preston resident who owns land in her community but doesn’t have a deed. She was born on the land she claims, and her father wants nothing more than for her to have it, but a lengthy and expensive legal process and an uncaring bureaucracy are major stumbling blocks. “First of all, that’s where I was born, on that property,” says Cain. “Ever since, that property has been part of me. As long as I am alive, that’s going to be alive for me.”

A moving story obout a four-year old little girl at the Shubenacadie Residential School and her doll, as remembered by Elder Elder Magit Sylliboy, and filmed by students of the We’koqom’a Mi’kmaw School in Waycobah, Cape Breton. A must see!

Dancer and choreographer Rhodnie Désir, a resident of Montreal with Haïtian roots, has arrived in Nova Scotia on a mission to explore through her art the many connections between slavery, the rhytms long kept alive within African Nova Scotian, Acadian and Mi’kmaq communities and resistance. This weekend we feature a short documentary about her visits to Martinique, Brazil and Haiti. We also gave Rhodnie a call to find out more about the Nova Scotia leg of the project.

This weekend we feature the wonderful Mi’kmaq multidisciplinary artist Ursula Johnson in no less than three short videos. Johnson was recently shortlisted as the Atlantic nominee for the Sobey Art Award, which is a pretty big deal. For us any excuse to feature these three short intriguing videos will do. Check it out!

It is terribly important that we support the few people in Nova Scotia who are on welfare and/or live in public housing who speak out publicly about the conditions they face, not only for what they have to tell us, but also for the simple act of saying it. They are examples and inspirations, what they do is crucial. Jodi Brown is one of these people, and this Weekend’s Video is about her unexpected encounter with both welfare and public housing. One day you have a job, then you get sick, next thing you have $56 grocery money for an entire month.