Monday, 23 September 2019

Dartmouth North MLA Susan Leblanc writes to Community Services Minister Kely Regan to tell her about the confusion re payments to ESIA clients who had to throw out spoiled food after hurricane Dorian.

“People are being told different things than their neighbours, getting different and conflicting information from people they trust, and what’s worse, some people will receive financial assistance without realizing it puts them in an overpayment situation until they receive their payment for October.”

Sheri Lecker of Adsum for Women and Children writes about gaps in the response to hurricane Dorian. “The storm’s adverse effects aren’t just arbitrary. They are most impactful on those of us with the fewest resources. It’s not just luck of the draw. While climate change promises to unleash increasing weather events like Dorian upon us, we need to better prepare for our community’s most vulnerable.”

Life is never easy for poor people, and this is never more true than when a hurricane hits. Reporter Kendall Worth talked to several people about their worries and concerns right before Dorian arrived in Nova Scotia.

Media release: “When a child is hungry; when they aren’t sure where home will be at the end of the day; when they don’t have adequate clothing; it’s very hard for them to focus on learning,” says Wozney. “The evidence is clear that on average, children living in poverty experience worse academic outcomes and are twice as likely to drop out of school. They also have a much higher chance of developing a mental health issue.”