Tuesday, 23 October 2018

Frequent contributor Judy Haiven joined the striking postal workers on the Almon Street picket line for a bit this morning. CUPW’s fight for just wages, better benefits, pay equity, safe work and against bullying in the workplace helps us all, she writes.  

Those working in the cannabis sector who are non-union will not likely have things like a fair wages, sick and medical benefits, a pension or to even be covered by provincial labour standards if they are classed as agriculture workers, writes NS federation of Labour president Danny Cavanagh. It’s time to protect and enshrine into law better protections for the workers’ employment and labour conditions.

Raymond Sheppard, representing African Nova Scotian City workers, and members of Equity Watch held a joint press conference to argue that in terms of bullying and racism there is no political will among senior management to truly address the issues, and that it is time for an independent third party, like the City’s Auditor General, to hold an inquiry.

News release: Hate Crimes against Persons of African Descent are escalating in Canada and indeed Nova Scotia while authorities are failing to take a strong public stand against these intolerant actions…Hate Crimes against young African Canadian youth are especially heinous.  Case in point, the September 19, 2018, alleged racial bullying, racist taunts and slights that culminated in Nhlanhla Dlamini being shot with a high velocity nail gun by a co-worker employed with PQ Properties Limited of New Glasgow, Nova Scotia.

Whether it’s postal banking, grocery delivery, affordable broadband internet access in communities that currently lack it, and postal-worker check in on seniors so that they can live longer in their own homes, postal workers have been pushing for better postal services for everyone, writes postal worker Mike Keefe.

Governments are increasingly using Social Impact Bonds as a method to finance what are broadly called social services. With social impact bonds governments repay investors only if the programs improve social outcomes, for example, lower unemployment or prison recidivism. The approach has been tried in Justice and corrections, skills training, public health, child welfare, services for seniors, early childhood development, education, homelessness, supports for people with physical disabilities, and mental health to name a few. But really it’s just another flavour of privatization, writes Danny Cavanagh.

NSGEU news release on this morning’s announcement that QEII redevelopment, which include the eventual decommissioning of part of the Victoria General site and the construction of five new health care buildings in the Halifax area, will be using a P3 model. “This government has chosen the most expensive way to get this project done,” said NSGEU President Jason MacLean.