Paul Wartman speaks with Chris GooGoo and Dawn Matheson about an initiative to improve the quality and accessibility of healthy, locally grown foods in Mi’kmaq communities. “We’ve always had agriculture. The public education system and history hasn’t told us that. We’ve always been told that we’ve been under the Indian Act, we’ve been given government handouts throughout history. We know that hasn’t always been the case–we’ve invented agriculture in many ways.”

Video: The Healthy Forest Coalition, an alliance of organizations and individuals who care about these kinds of things, are calling on the government to institute a “Singing Season” in Nova Scotia, which would pause forestry operation from May 15-July 31, and give the migratory birds that nest in our woods the time they need to raise their young.

Hartlen Point, a pristine little wilderness area at the mouth of Halifax Harbour, is destined to become the location for a training complex for the Canadian Navy. Somehow an environmental impact assessment is already underway and the window for public comment closed in January. It doesn’t look like any comments were received.

Half hour west of Halifax, spanning 32,000 acres between the Panuke and Indian lakes immediately north of Highway 103, there waits a wilderness, simmering with potential and public use, aspiring to protection from our provincial government, all the while being slowly disassembled by people with chainsaws. Zack Metcalfe reports on the Ingram River Wilderness Area, an idea that’s just won’t quit.

PSA: June 14–15, we invite you to watch a free screening of the award-winning Rights of Nature documentary, Invisible Hand. It follows several communities as they fight back against big industry’s quest to offload toxic waste, build more pipelines, and develop the land at any cost—even if it means contaminating rivers and destroying ecosystems. The title, Invisible Hand, refers to the invisible hand of capitalism.