Sunday, 24 September 2017

Stephen Thomas, energy coordinator at the Ecology Action Center, read the news about the most recent donation by a fossil-fuel company to Dalhousie University and he took to Facebook to express his displeasure and concern. We asked if we could republish it, and he agreed, although he felt it was  pretty unpolished. Sometimes unpolished is fine. 

Nova Scotia is one of Canada’s most emissions-intensive provinces. Peggy Cameron wrote an open letter to Stephen McNeil pleading to change that. “You need to say “no” to highways and pipelines that increase our use of fossil fuels. Then you need to tackle this short list: increase renewables for Nova Scotian use, not export; shut down coal-fired generating plants; incentivize regenerative agricultural practices; stop clear-cutting and pesticide-spraying; promote afforestation and value-added production; establish a province wide integrated transportation network; and create a net-zero-carbon building programme.”

A letter written by Joanne Light to federal Fisheries minister Dominic Leblanc. She pleads for a radical rethink of the proposed twinned Avon River causeway in Windsor. Endangered salmon cannot enter the Avon River to spawn, and that should be fixed. Leblanc knows what to do, after all, a couple of years ago he helped fix a similar problem in the Peticodiac River, in his own riding.

No longer strictly a rural issue, a recent approval by the Department of Environment suggests the spraying of chemicals to control vegetation is coming to the railway corridor in downtown Dartmouth and along the Bedford Highway.

The Muskrat Falls development may be far away in Labrador, but it is very much Nova Scotia’s business. That was the message delivered by speakers at a news conference held outside the Emera / Nova Scotia Power offices on Lower Water Street in downtown Halifax this morning. “What we are seeing is massive destruction and genocide for profit. The crown corporation Nalcor is giving itself the legal authority to commit genocide using water as a vehicle for devastation. Once they drown the landscape, methylmercury poisoning is inevitable.  We are talking mass genocide to all vegetation, medicines and all living species. Lives will be lost,” said Michelle Paul.

The Muskrat Falls project, future source for so-called green electricity for Nova Scotia, is in fact a man-made environmental disaster that has few equals. Meanwhile journalists who report on protests are muzzled, and land defenders continue to be thrown in jail. Progressive politicians in Nova Scotia prefer to look the other way, as if it isn’t our business.

Earlier this year the Nova Scotia Advocate was proud and excited to publish El Jones’ We will stop Alton Gas, right after her reading at a  fundraiser for the fearless Alton Gas resisters. Now we bring you Stop Alton Gas, the movie, spoken by El Jones, wonderfully animated by Rachel Derrah and filmed by Izrael Media Arts. Check it out!

Peggy Cameron, founding member of Friends of the Halifax Common, takes issue with a proposal now before Council to build a soccer stadium on the Wanderer’s Grounds, to remain there for at least the next three years. There are lots of issues, Cameron writes, but ” the larger issue is the private use of the public’s space for private profit of a private businessman.”