Thursday, 30 March 2017

Rebecca Hussman reports on the Harrietsfield homeowners who, after nearly eight years, have won the legal battles involving a contaminated recycling site in Harrietsfield. They are not celebrating yet. The companies responsible for the pollution have stopped court-mandated water monitoring, and residents are still waiting for water treatment systems that the province promised would be in place by February. The story includes a video that shows the devastating effects of the contamination.

“In our own community here, every moment of every day is consumed with the contaminated water, either when you go to have a shower, brush your teeth, whatever… It’s always there in the back of your mind, and it’s very frustrating.”

Burning biomass to generate electricity is not green. In fact, using coal in the short term is cleaner. And short term here means for the next sixty to seventy years. Also, a very sad 2011 video of a clearcut at Higgins Mountain, Cumberland County.

How does environmental racism manifest in Nova Scotia? How do you establish a direct link between health issues in a community and the landfill down the road? We speak with Dr. Ingrid Waldron of the ENRICH project. and meet with two scientists who looked at water quality issues in Lincolnville, an African Nova Scotian community situated near a large landfill.

Ken Summers reports on the abandoned oil well in Cogmagun, Hants County. It is still not cleaned up 14 years later. Triangle Petroleum is on the hook for cleanup costs, but it’s facing bankruptcy in the US and it got a pretty sweet deal from the province. It will pay nothing.

Volunteers associated with the Ecology Action Centre and various naturalist groups conducted a “Bio Blitz” on the proposed route for the gas pipeline slated to supply the Alton Gas Storage project in Brentwood and crossing a wilderness area. It appears Alton Gas missed at least one wetland area.

Ten years after Nova Scotia enticed Triangle Petroleum to experiment with hydraulic fracturing for shale gas in Kennetcook, Hants County, the company walked away and it’s the province that is cleaning up the mess left behind. The province is unwilling to explain what deal it made.