Sunday, 20 October 2019

A poem by Angela “Angee” Bowden, to remember that this month 400 years ago slaves first arrived in North America.

When the past is my present
And my scars still remain
And our lives still don’t matter
I am living in that pain

PSA: This dynamic dramatic musical production written and directed by Anne Johnson-McDonald, is about both the historical and present power of the people of Preston, beginning with the wisdom of an African elder proclaiming and foretelling the power and faith of the people to overcome adversity to reach the greatness of their preordained destiny.

A poem by Chad Norman about the men of the N.C.A, and others as well, dressed in whiteness, the little fellas with big hatreds. Donald, Jared, Andrew, Jason, Doug, and even Stephen…

It’s exhausting
The way we live
Taking home microaggressions
That we never ask for

From Tired bodies, a poem by Martha Mutale, a poet from Zambia who now lives in Nova Scotia

Lots of people got angry when the provincial government announced it set aside $80 million in support of a new building for the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia. Healthcare is in crisis, they say, and spending money on something as unnecessary and luxurious as art at this time is a very bad idea. To further explore why art matters from a societal point of view, and indeed functions as a major economic engine all on its own, I met with writer and St. Mary’s University Art Gallery director Robin Metcalfe, who has thought deeply about these matters.