A CBC story reporting on the fight of Lucasville residents to get the city to deal with a horse farm that they say smells up the neighborhood never mentions the community’s ancient African Nova Scotian roots. Many people in Lucasville have been vocal about their opinion that race is an important piece of the puzzle if you want to understan what is really going on here.

I had a great time at SMU last week, digging through box after box of newspaper clippings, minutes posters, and brochures related to well over forty years of civil rights, labour and social justice struggles here in Nova Scotia and beyond. Lynn Jones has scissors, and she isn’t afraid to use them. Eighteen boxes of documentation have found a home at the St Mary’s archives.

The provincial government is only halfheartedly supporting Black History Month in PEI, says a resident. The Black community on the Island could really use the help. ““The white islanders here need to hear that this is a community that is important and vibrant.”

Eternal Life: Preserving the Memory of Beechville is a reflective look at how one African Nova-Scotian community is coping with urban sprawl encroaching on its borders. Following the war of 1812, a group of freed slaves settled in Beechville, Nova Scotia as refugees escaping the United States. Almost two centuries later, as urbanization threatens many of Canada’s rural communities, Beechville itself is being swallowed up.