Stacey Gomez: There are migrant workers who want to be vaccinated and who haven’t yet received their first dose. At the same time, there are migrant workers who are being pressured to get the vaccine. For this racialized workforce with precarious immigration status, vaccine access is an urgent issue of racial inequity that must be addressed.

Nine days after announcing that schools would remain closed until September the government did a sudden 180. Teachers were out of the loop, and it wasn’t a smooth transition. Stephen Wentzell speaks with the minister, the union, and a teacher to find out what went wrong, and how a heatwave made things even worse.

During the first wave of the pandemic, an Acadia University research team conducted a survey of three groups of essential workers in Nova Scotia — long-term care workers, retail workers and teachers. When asked if the media focused on the most important issues of their work, 69 per cent of participants responded “no” versus 31 per cent who said “yes.”

SInce at least late February migrant justice advocates and health experts have been asking the province to implement specific measures ensure that migrants, including people without migration status, refugee claimants, international students and migrant workers, all have full access to the COVID-19 vaccine. Getting the province to pay attention continues to be an uphill battle.

Media release: With schools now reopening, it’s critical the province allow for a full and transparent review of school COVID-19 cases says the NSTU. Given the hundreds of school aged children that tested positive for COVID in late April and early May, and the sheer volume of schools impacted, a vague number in a talking point is not sufficient to assure families that schools were not a source of community transmission less than a month ago.