Thursday, 22 August 2019

News release: The discovery of one uncapped contaminating drill hole on Warwick Mountain and the possibility of more leaking drill holes has raised the spectre of 780 other unmonitored mining exploration drill holes across the province. SuNNS is asking the Department of Energy and Mines to immediately instruct staff to visit all drill hole sites and return in 6 months with a report on their condition.

In this updated story Ken Summers writes that when gas prices rise and if government were to cave in to the relentless pressures by the fracking industry they would be back drilling fracking wells in Kennetcook in a jiffy. Here is why, and what that would look like.

Nova Scotia is one of Canada’s most emissions-intensive provinces. Peggy Cameron wrote an open letter to Stephen McNeil pleading to change that. “You need to say “no” to highways and pipelines that increase our use of fossil fuels. Then you need to tackle this short list: increase renewables for Nova Scotian use, not export; shut down coal-fired generating plants; incentivize regenerative agricultural practices; stop clear-cutting and pesticide-spraying; promote afforestation and value-added production; establish a province wide integrated transportation network; and create a net-zero-carbon building programme.”

Ken Summers reports on the abandoned oil well in Cogmagun, Hants County. It is still not cleaned up 14 years later. Triangle Petroleum is on the hook for cleanup costs, but it’s facing bankruptcy in the US and it got a pretty sweet deal from the province. It will pay nothing.

Ten years after Nova Scotia enticed Triangle Petroleum to experiment with hydraulic fracturing for shale gas in Kennetcook, Hants County, the company walked away and it’s the province that is cleaning up the mess left behind. The province is unwilling to explain what deal it made.