Christine Saulnier looks at the llving wage report that Halifax Council will consider on Tuesday. “Why should HRM ask its contractors to pay a living wage and not do so itself? City Council could adopt a resolution committing to pay all direct and indirect city workers a living wage,” she writes.

We do have an exceptionally low percentage of women on council, but in keeping with many other cities we also have a low percentage of Black, Brown or Indigenous councilors. Halifax has no noticeably disabled councillors. All this is to say that when you cast your ballot in 25 days, think about equity.

Media release: The purpose of the survey is to determine candidates’ stances on key issues related to policing, ahead of the upcoming municipal election on October 17, 2020. Topics covered in the survey range from the Calls for Justice from the Report of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, to the HRM budget and the delivery of policing services by the Halifax Regional Police and RCMP.

Martyn Williams, on behalf of the group HRM Safe Streets for Everyone, is writing a Councillors survival guide to safer streets and traffic, part 1 of which we are happy to publish here on the Nova Scotia Advocate site. It targets mayor and council hopefuls, but it is also useful to residents as it sets out the issues, and what councillors can do to resolve them. It’s a comprehensive guide, and, much like Martyn’s articles, the product of meticulous research.

Press release: Jen Powley has declared her candidacy for the upcoming HRM municipal election in District 7, Halifax South Downtown. Powley is a planner, author and activist who has called District 7 her home for the last 20 years. She is a long-time advocate for accessibility, newcomers to Canada, and an ally for 2SLGBTQI+ folks.

Halifax Council held a three hour virtual public hearing on a proposal to allow allow basement apartments and backyard suites for single-family homes, townhouses and duplexes across the municipality. Stella Lord spoke on behalf of the Community Society to End Poverty, pushing back on expectations that the changes will provide substantial amounts of new affordable housing, while suggesting some more effective approaches.