Thursday, 22 August 2019

Evelyn C. White profiles Giovanni Johnson, microbiologist and the only person of African descent employed as an assistant brewer in the booming Nova Scotia craft beer industry. “I grew up eating fresh coconut, mango, watermelon, kiwi, etc., in the Bahamas,” he said. “So it’s natural for me to develop recipes that include tropical notes. I think people like them, too.”

Scott Neigh’s weekly podcast is a wonderful thing, and Scott is a kind man who always allows us to share an interview whenever the topic has a Nova Scotia relevance. Here he speaks with North Preston and Nort End community activist LaMeia Reddick, and Ted Rutland, author of Displacing Blackness: Planning, Power, and Race in Twentieth-Century Halifax, a must-read for anybody interested in urban planning and / or the history of the struggle against racism in Halifax. It’s a book I simply can’t recommend enough.

A new CCPA report takes a very close look at the sad picture of child poverty in Halifax. It contains information you likely didn’t know about your community or neighborhood. For instance, Spryfield has a child poverty rate of 40%, and in rural Nova Scotia North Preston (40%), East Preston (38.9), and Sheet Harbour (26.1%) lead the pack. Meanwhile, Fall RIver has a child poverty rate of a mere 3.9%.

Yesterday we published Judy Haiven’s take on the Halifax Explosion, arguing that in essence a war crime occurred, today Tony Seed makes a similar case in this well-researched article. “The tragedy of the Halifax Explosion, the subsequent Naval Magazine explosion of July 1945 and other preventable incidents since then shows that the granting of military-naval concessions and other privileges to the superpowers and their naval fleets represent nothing but great danger to the democratic right of the people to live in peace and to their freedom.”

Judy Haiven on why the many context-free commemorative events of the Halifax Explosion centenary are missing an important point: There was no military justification for the presence of a ship loaded with 5.8 million pounds of TNT in our harbour. The Halifax Explosion was a war crime, and innocent women, men and children paid an awful price.

Now that the North End Community Health Centre has moved to new quarters on Gottingen Street, the Johanna B Oosterveld Centre, often referred to as the JBO, is lost to the community. Many local groups used that space for meetings, press conferences, panels and other activities. Nancy Hunter. who used to teach a yoga class there, believes it’s part of a trend and wonders what we can do to stop it.

Tenants of Harbour City Homes on Brunswick Street don’t know that their landlord is up to. Last summer the not-for-profit was forced to sell nine buildings and 34 affordable housing units were lost to the North End. Are things going better now? Having a seat on the Board of Directors would answer such questions, tenants suggest. Right now the company isn’t talking.