Monday, 22 July 2019

Lately things haven’t been looking so great for Pieridae Energy, promoter of the $10 billion proposed Goldboro liquefied natural gas plant in Guysborough County. Researcher Ken Summers explains how a Supreme Court decision affecting already struggling gas producers is pulling the company into financial trouble.

Ken Summers takes a closer look at the viability of the Goldboro LNG plant, and he finds serious obstacles to full development that the company would rather its German government investors wouldn’t know about. Not stated, but implied, this also means that it isn’t too late to resist this mega project that will jeopardize Nova Scotia’s greenhouse gas reduction targets.

There are solid signs the proposed Goldboro Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) plant in Guysborough County is getting ever closer to ramping up. This is bad news for people who worry about climate change as it raises doubts about Nova Scotia’s ability to meet its greenhouse gas (GHC) reduction targets.  Independent researcher Ken Summers did a deep dive, and this is what he discovered.

In this updated story Ken Summers writes that when gas prices rise and if government were to cave in to the relentless pressures by the fracking industry they would be back drilling fracking wells in Kennetcook in a jiffy. Here is why, and what that would look like.

A proposed gas pipeline for the Alton Gas storage project is set to cross the stunningly beautiful Stewiacke River Wilderness Area, although naturalists are strongly opposed.  As well, the proposed Saint Andrews River Wilderness Area boundaries were modified at the time, presumably to accommodate the pipeline. Investigative reporter Ken Summers looks at the politics of this project in this first of a two-part series.

Ken Summers reports on the abandoned oil well in Cogmagun, Hants County. It is still not cleaned up 14 years later. Triangle Petroleum is on the hook for cleanup costs, but it’s facing bankruptcy in the US and it got a pretty sweet deal from the province. It will pay nothing.

Volunteers associated with the Ecology Action Centre and various naturalist groups conducted a “Bio Blitz” on the proposed route for the gas pipeline slated to supply the Alton Gas Storage project in Brentwood and crossing a wilderness area. It appears Alton Gas missed at least one wetland area.

Ten years after Nova Scotia enticed Triangle Petroleum to experiment with hydraulic fracturing for shale gas in Kennetcook, Hants County, the company walked away and it’s the province that is cleaning up the mess left behind. The province is unwilling to explain what deal it made.