Just want to share this Facebook post written by a mother who, with help from Adsum for Women and Children, is about to move into one of Adsum’s apartment units. This after 9 months of couch surfing, and despite the horrible pandemic that makes everything more difficult.

Sheri Lecker of Adsum for Women and Children writes about gaps in the response to hurricane Dorian. “The storm’s adverse effects aren’t just arbitrary. They are most impactful on those of us with the fewest resources. It’s not just luck of the draw. While climate change promises to unleash increasing weather events like Dorian upon us, we need to better prepare for our community’s most vulnerable.”

“Before Adsum helped me, my life was a bit rocky. I left home at 16 and until now, I’ve never been in a stable place in my life. I was also lacking solid support and solid relationships. Living with depression and anxiety is a struggle on its own, but without proper safety nets in place, a person can struggle with just making it day to day.” Our final first-voice story in a series of three about the work of Adsum for Women and Children.

“It was just past 1:00 AM, and there was snow on the steps. I was freezing, exhausted, disoriented, and past caring. About anything. I was standing in front of a door that I was almost hoping wouldn’t open. The patrol car, which had brought me here, waited.  The door opened. Terrified, completely lost, I stepped through it.” Evelyn Napier on how she regained self respect and dignity thanks to the support of Adsum for Women and Children and her refurbished wheel steed Rocinante.

“I had just turned 60 and I knew I had to make some drastic changes in my life, if not I felt certain I would not have a life, or my mind would be so completely gone, that I would not have been any good to myself or anyone else.  I should have been looking forward to retirement and a relaxed future but instead I was sleeping with my phone under my bed clothes ready to dial 911.” Devorah Rivkah writes about the life-changing powers of Adsum for Women and Children.

“If I look back, I say wow, I am not the same person. I take pride in my job, I take pride in myself. I work hard, I work harder than I ever have for anything. It’s very overwhelming for sure. It’s a great feeling.”

A weekend video about the excellent work of Adsum for Women and Children.

A collective agreement signed earlier this week between Adsum House and its employees, members of CUPE, will ensure that all employees of Adsum for Women and Children will earn at least a living wage. This is likely a first in Nova Scotia. It’s part of a deliberate strategy, says executive director Sheri Lecker. “Sometimes you cannot wait until all pieces of the puzzle are there. This is one of those times.”