After the Africville rally I had a longer conversation with Denise Allen, one of the organizers and an Africville survivor herself. “I don’t know who our political representatives represent when they fight against justice for Africville. They’re certainly not representing their constituents. What they’re looking out for is the bottom line, they just don’t want to pay.”

In 1989, MSVU Art Gallery, the Black Cultural Centre for Nova Scotia, and the Africville Genealogical Society collaborated on the exhibition Africville: A Spirit That Lives On. Today, on the 30th anniversary of the exhibition, the collaborators have reunited and are joined by the Africville Museum, to create a project looking back at the original exhibition and take the opportunity to reflect on what has happened since.

Scott Neigh’s weekly podcast is a wonderful thing, and Scott is a kind man who always allows us to share an interview whenever the topic has a Nova Scotia relevance. Here he speaks with North Preston and Nort End community activist LaMeia Reddick, and Ted Rutland, author of Displacing Blackness: Planning, Power, and Race in Twentieth-Century Halifax, a must-read for anybody interested in urban planning and / or the history of the struggle against racism in Halifax. It’s a book I simply can’t recommend enough.