Friday, 19 July 2019

The Nova Scotia Utilities and Review Board is deciding whether to extend a construction permit for the Alton Gas underground storage caverns to 2023. Some 60 interested parties submitted comments in writing. What happens next, and how the Board reaches its decision is anybody’s guess. This secrecy and lack of dialogue is not a good thing, given the controversies and complexities surrounding the project.

PSA: “At this time it appears both federal and provincial governments are knowingly protecting Alton Gas instead of protecting fish habitat and Treaty Rights. This needs to stop now. The laws are in place, it is now your duty as the government to suspend all permits and charge the company.” 

After talking with with civil servants at Environment and Climate Change Canada, local water protectors believe.that Alton Gas doesn’t have the necessary approvals to start the release of brine into the Shubenacadie River. We asked the feds and the province what’s up, and their responses were pretty vague.

News release: Water protector and Mi’kmaq Elder Dorene Bernard did not mince words during a speech by Premier McNeil this morning. The premier’s talk was entitled ‘Open for Business: Nova Scotia on the Move’, which Bernard says is a blatant glossing over of the Indigenous right to free, prior, and informed consent. “We’re only open for business if treaty rights holders give their free, prior, and informed consent,” says Bernard. “That consent doesn’t come from the KMK termination table, it comes from the people and the traditional governments.”

This weekend’s video is a short trailer for the documentary The water protectors’ journey. This film about the Alton Gas resistance documents a journey along the Sipekne’katik River, which leads to a sacred island known to the Mi’kmaq as the traditional campsite of Glooscap’s grandmother. The full film premieres in Halifax this Saturday March 31.