Ian MacIntosh, a much loved resident of Sydney, Cape Breton, was struck while crossing legally on a signalized intersection crosswalk outside the Cape Breton Regional hospital on George Street by a driver turning left. He died one week later, aged 66. Martyn Williams takes a closer look at what happened and what lessons we should learn. “This accident should never have happened,” Ian’s widow Kathryn (Kathy) MacIntosh tells Martyn.

There’s a very nice little book out about the coal miners’ (and steel workers’) fight against greedy and heartless corporations in early twentieth century Cape Breton. What’s especially great about it is that author Joanne Schwartz wrote it for kids, not the really young ones I guess, but say the 10 to 15 year olds. Nimbus, the publisher, suggests children as young as 7 may go for it.

Media release: At 2pm today, the Cow Bay Environmental Coalition and their local MLA Brian Comer will meet with NS Minister of Environment and Climate Change Keith Irving to address the low frequency noise and methane pollution from the ventilation fans at the Donkin Mine. The coalition is composed of dozens of families impacted since the coal mine ceased operations in 2020.

Danny CAvanagh: On Tuesday, the CEO of the J.A. Douglas McCurdy Sydney Airport said they have received notification Air Canada flights to Toronto and Halifax will be cut effective Jan. 11, 2021, and the local Jazz aviation station will be closed until further notice. This is a devastating blow to Cape Breton residents, workers and businesses.

In mid-October, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) seized around 200 lobster traps from Mi’kmaq fishers in Unama’ki (Cape Breton, Nova Scotia). “It’s a struggle for them. They’re not making a lot of money, but it’s not about the money,” Bernadette Marshall told Robin Tress “It’s about the treaty right, and we’ve waited long enough.”

Historian David Frank on Miners’ Houses, the painting of a Glace Bay townscape by Group of Seven painter Lawren Harris, now on a stamp. Harris visited Glace Bay in 1925, the same year striking miner William Davis was shot by company police. “Glace Bay is really no town, but a number of huddles of box-like houses around scattered coal mine mouths. . . . It’s drab and dreary and bedraggled even on a sunny day . . . “, Harris wrote at the time.