Thursday, 21 November 2019

Scott Neigh, through his weekly Talking Radical podcast, provides a centre stage to activists, their causes, and the how and why of their strategic approaches. Scott always kindly allows me to repost a podcast if it is of particular relevance to Nova Scotia Advocate readers. Earlier we featured his eye opening interview with El Jones on organizing vulnerable prison populations and the responsibilities that brings, and an interview with water protectors Dorene Bernard and Rebecca Moore on the mess that is Alton Gas. This week we present Scott’s interview with Marilyn Keddy and Peter Puxley of the Campaign to Protect Offshore Nova Scotia,, about the threat of offshore oil exploration to climate change and fisheries, and about the challenges of organizing in rural Nova Scotia.

Feeling the pressure of increased public scrutiny, the Canada-Nova Scotia Offshore Petroleum Board (CNSOPB) met this afternoon with municipal councillors from western Nova Scotia, hoping to convince them that offshore oil exploration is safe. Don’t be fooled, says Marion Moore, of the Campaign to Protect Offshore Nova Scotia. “I would tell them that they’re being fed a big story from an organization that is completely captured by the oil industry,”  Moore tells the Nova Scotia Advocate.

The same people who gave you the Deepwater Horizon disaster now want to drill along the Nova Scotia South Shore. The Campaign to Protect Offshore Nova Scotia (CPONS) released its response to the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency (CEAA) draft report on BP’s proposed offshore drilling program. “You would be hard-pressed to find more than a handful of people along the South Shore who know anything about BP’s plans and their potential impact, let alone that a federal agency has been conducting a study of BP’s environmental assessment over the past year or so.”

Shell Canada and other large energy corporations basically get their way with our oceans, regulation is a farce and risks are ignored. That’s the opinion of a new South Shore organization, the Campaign to Protect Offshore Nova Scotia. It has some suggestions on how to fix the problem.