Awareness of environmental racism in Nova Scotia has changed for the better over the last five years or so. A private members bill, shaped to a large extent by Dr. Ingrid Waldron and introduced by then NDP MLA Lenore Zann in 2015, played a considerable part in that shift. Waldron and Zann, now a Liberal MP, are giving the legislation another shot, this time in Ottawa.

Fernwood Publishing in partnership with The ENRICH Project presents the launch of More Powerful Together: Conversations With Climate Activists and Indigenous Land Defenders. This event will feature a keynote by the author, Dr. Jen Gobby, followed by a panel discussion moderated by Dr. Alex Khasnabish. The panel discussion will focus on issues of Migrant Justice, Climate/Environmental Justice, Indigenous Sovereignty and Land Back, the Movement for Black Lives, and ways to build stronger links between these different movements and struggles.

While municipalities reliably test the quality of water delivered through the utilities they manage, rural residents who rely on wells are on their own, reports new contributor Fazeela Jiwa. Now a new organization, Rural Water Watch Association (RWW), will respond to rural community members’ calls to test their water quality, addressing concerns about living close to toxic sites like landfills or incinerators.

This morning at the launch of the Environmental Bill of Rights Louise Delisle, a resident of the Black community within the Town of Shelburne, spoke about the damage done by pollution from the town dump placed right in the middle of the community. With her permission we publish that speech here.
“We were not allowed to speak. They would never speak for fear of repercussions, not being able to care for their families if they spoke up because they would lose their job.”