Monday, 20 May 2019

Scott Domenie reflects on the Christchurch terror attack. “Anger is a gift. It is powerful and anyone who fights for a more just and equal world should not shy away from it. However, what we need now is the collective rage of people and communities working together, and who have each other’s back.”

Media release: Community members in Halifax will mark the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination with a rally in support of migrant justice beginning at 4:30pm on Thursday, March 21st. The rally takes place outside of the Halifax Convention Centre (1650 Argyle St), site of the 21st National Metropolis Conference for those working in the field of immigration and settlement in Canada.

Rana Zaman, on the lessons we must draw from latest sexual abuse cases within the Catholic Church. “My response – blame the predators, the higher ups and the institutions that protect these despicable abusers, but don’t blame the religion. The religion is not to blame for the vile acts of some of its practitioners.”

A dispute about garbage in a Halifax park very quickly degenerates into a hateful diatribe full of racist and Islamophobic tropes. In Nova Scotia we have been spared the headline-producing Islamophobia we have seen elsewhere in Canada, for now. But it’s here, just below the surface.  

“Should I counsel students at Dalhousie not to critique social institutions or practices, or not to invite academics who may do so, for fear of reprisals on the part of Dalhousie University, lest a student file a complaint that actually affirms the analysis in question?” Saint Mary’s professor Darryl Leroux writes an open letter to Dalhousie University administration pointing out that disciplining Masuma Khan for her FB post on white fragility exemplifies precisely the type of racism that is rampant on university campuses, including at Dalhousie.

Attached to the letter is an abridged version of a keynote address on white fragility in academia that professor Leroux delivered last year to the Dalhousie Arts and Social Sciences Society. This lecture is eerily applicable to what is transpiring at Dalhousie right now.