Important open letter by Eastern Door, a group of L’nu and Indigenous lawyers in Nova Scotia & Atlantic Canada, on who gets to regulate the Moderate Livelihood fishery. “Exercising self-government in accordance with Netukulimk – allowing L’nuk fishers to work legally and rightfully – is all the Sipekne’katik First Nation has done,” they write.

The Mi’kmaq often refer to Black Ash wood as white gold: It’s the perfect material for basket-making, but now that the Emerald Ash Borer has arrived on the east coast, the Black Ash is in danger of disappearing entirely in Nova Scotia. Quentin Kerr investigates these new threats to the Black Ash tree, and how Mi’kmawey Forestry, imbued with the spirit of Netukulimk, is doing what it can to preserve the species.

This weekend we feature the wonderful Mi’kmaq multidisciplinary artist Ursula Johnson in no less than three short videos. Johnson was recently shortlisted as the Atlantic nominee for the Sobey Art Award, which is a pretty big deal. For us any excuse to feature these three short intriguing videos will do. Check it out!

This weekend’s weekend video is Seeking Netukulimk, by Martha Stiegman. Learn about Mi’kmaq treaties and stewardship of the land in this lyrical documentary by a master documentary maker.