Regardless of Covid 19, justice is past due for African Nova Scotians and African people. Access to real and true justice has always been late for African people, if it was even meted out at all. The passage of time and delays only adds to the pain and suffering. It is indeed a tragedy within a tragedy.

Activist and poet Angela Bowden reflects on the urgent need to start talking about reparations to the Black community in Nova Scotia. “The evidence and framework for reparations is already embedded in the wisdom and trauma of our elders and our youth, we require all of you to get this job done,” she writes.

Raymond Sheppard explains why Nhlanhla Dlamini is his nomination for person of the year. “He has shown courage in the face of adversity, he tries at all costs to avoid confrontation, and he has spoken truth to power and privilege. He is a silence breaker while sending a clear message. He is gentle, loving, caring and respecting. As a young man he has become a role model to other young people and to those not so young.

The seemingly frivolous blackface Trudeau engaged in 18 years ago and the hard core racist bullying that Nhlanhla Dlamini was subjected to at work in Pictou County are in essence not all that different, writes Judy Haiven.

Today I went to Pictou to hear the Shawn Wade Hynes verdict. Hynes is the guy who shot a high velocity nail gun at young co-worker Nhlanhla Dlamini. I don’t think most white people understood how important a case it was for many in the African Nova Scotian community, nor the surprise and tremendous relief that was felt when Hynes was found guilty of criminal negligence and assault with a weapon.

PSA: The verdict in the Nhlanhla Dlamini case will be rendered by Judge Del Atwood on Thursday September 26 @ 1:30 pm at the Provincial court house in Pictou. Please come join us while we support Nhlanhla and his family .

“If ever there was a case that was cut and dry this is it. If the Nova Scotia Justice system fails Nhlanhla in their decision and do not hold Nhlahla’s abuser accountable for the damage his crimes have caused it will be a significant miscarriage of justice in our province.”

Angela (Angee) Bowden reflects on 400 years of slavery and the upcoming trial of Shawn Hynes, accused of shooting a high velocity nail gun at his Black fellow worker Nhlanhla Dlamini.

Hate Crimes against Persons of African Descent are escalating rapidly in Canada and indeed Nova Scotia while authorities are failing to take a strong public stand against these intolerant actions. We ask that you and your colleagues, friends and family make a concerted effort to attend one, two or all three days of the September 2019 trial. If you are unable to be there, you can help in other ways. We encourage you to write letters demanding justice for Nhlanhla to your MLA, the Crown Prosecution Service, the Premier, Prime Minister and share this information to all your networks. Vocalize your support, express how you feel and demand Justice for Nhlanhla Dlamini.