Media release: Protest coordinator, Angela Bowden, the Dlamini family and the citizens of Nova Scotia would like to see the court ruling for house arrest for Shawn Wade Hynes be increased to jail time to reflect the seriousness of the crime. The deliberate attempted murder on Nhlanhla Dlamini’s life was a violent, racist hate crime and it should have been treated as such.

Angela Bowden on yesterday’s sentencing of Shawn Wade Hynes. the white man who shot a staple gun at young Nhlanhla Dlamini: “Hynes’ crimes were cushioned by his best interests (potential rehabilitation and trauma), while it paid lip service to the actual trauma he caused his victim. I wonder why Shawn Hynes’ character was granted the benefit of the doubt straight in the face of his clear anti-Blackness?”

What will it take for Black Lives to Matter in Nova Scotia? The African Nova Scotian Decade for People of African Descent Coalition, representing African Nova Scotian organizations across the province, joins the many concerned citizens who are calling for the sentencing of Shawn Wade Hynes without further delay.

Wayne Desmond looks at the delays in the conviction of Shawn Wade Hynes, who in a case that has racist overtones, shot his young co-worker Nhlanhla Dlamini with a high velocity nail gun. One and a half years have passed since the defendant was found guilty, and sentencing has been postponed several times. Meanwhile, the defendant’s life has not changed in any regard. He is able to continue his life as a “not guilty” individual.

It’s been 2.5 since a co-worker seriously injured Nhlanhla Dlamini with a nail gun, and 1.5 years since a guilty verdict was rendered, but the man found guilty still has not been sentenced. For Nhlanhla’s family and supporters that’s too long a wait. Justice must be served, and must be seen to be served.

Regardless of Covid 19, justice is past due for African Nova Scotians and African people. Access to real and true justice has always been late for African people, if it was even meted out at all. The passage of time and delays only adds to the pain and suffering. It is indeed a tragedy within a tragedy.

Activist and poet Angela Bowden reflects on the urgent need to start talking about reparations to the Black community in Nova Scotia. “The evidence and framework for reparations is already embedded in the wisdom and trauma of our elders and our youth, we require all of you to get this job done,” she writes.

Raymond Sheppard explains why Nhlanhla Dlamini is his nomination for person of the year. “He has shown courage in the face of adversity, he tries at all costs to avoid confrontation, and he has spoken truth to power and privilege. He is a silence breaker while sending a clear message. He is gentle, loving, caring and respecting. As a young man he has become a role model to other young people and to those not so young.