Tuesday, 22 January 2019

Announcing a new series of articles by Barbara Carter, about what it like to to live with chronic pain in Nova Scotia. “Sometimes I think we remain too silent about too many things. Often we wait for someone else to be the change we want to see.This is why I want to share some of my personal experiences with Nova Scotia Advocate readers over the next months, in the hope that it may benefit someone else, in some way.” Barbara tells me she is thinking about tackling her experiences with getting diagnosed and the role of the WCB next.

Kendall meets up with a young woman, at one time on income assistance, who continues to turn her life around. A touching story with a definite Christmas flavour.

Many parents of autistic children are told about the EIBI program, and that it’s extremely important that their children receive it so they can have a good future. And they almost always accept this advice without question. But there are other options that are not based in Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA), and that are non-pathologizing, e.g. that do not assume that there is something fundamentally wrong with the child. Alex Kronstein takes a look at one such option.

Rebecca Hussman went to a talk by registered nurse and activist Martha Paynter about the shocking lack of health care for women in Nova Scotia prisons. Paynter dedicated her talk to two women who died while in Truro’s Nova Institution for Women in 2015: Veronica Park and Camille Strickland-Murphy. “… this is what happens when we inadequately care for people inside,” Paynter said.

Our featured poet this month is Annick MacAskill, an amazing poet. Her poem November 11 is one of nine poems selected as a result of a call for poems we issued in May. I love how this poem ends, so fiery and colourful. I am also featuring a monoprint by Nova Scotia printmaker / artist Bonnie Baker. I thought Bonnie’s piece goes well with the poem.