Wednesday, 21 November 2018

Our featured poet this month is Annick MacAskill, an amazing poet. Her poem November 11 is one of nine poems selected as a result of a call for poems we issued in May. I love how this poem ends, so fiery and colourful. I am also featuring a monoprint by Nova Scotia printmaker / artist Bonnie Baker. I thought Bonnie’s piece goes well with the poem.

Delighted to present Vision, a poem by Heidi Mitton, one of the poems we selected as the result of our call for poems earlier this year. In her short bio she quotes Alice Walker, “Poetry is the lifeblood of rebellion, revolution and the raising of consciousness.” We agree, and believe that’s precisely why among our op-eds and stories about poverty, racism, and inclusion the poems we publish are entirely an excellent fit.

“Before Adsum helped me, my life was a bit rocky. I left home at 16 and until now, I’ve never been in a stable place in my life. I was also lacking solid support and solid relationships. Living with depression and anxiety is a struggle on its own, but without proper safety nets in place, a person can struggle with just making it day to day.” Our final first-voice story in a series of three about the work of Adsum for Women and Children.

“It was just past 1:00 AM, and there was snow on the steps. I was freezing, exhausted, disoriented, and past caring. About anything. I was standing in front of a door that I was almost hoping wouldn’t open. The patrol car, which had brought me here, waited.  The door opened. Terrified, completely lost, I stepped through it.” Evelyn Napier on how she regained self respect and dignity thanks to the support of Adsum for Women and Children and her refurbished wheel steed Rocinante.

Poet and writer Joanne Bealy went to the Kent Monkman talk at the Central Library, and learned some hard lessons about white privilege and complicity, not just from Monkman but especially from two Black women.