I remember being taken aback when I first arrived in Nova Scotia a long time ago, reading the full names and addresses of people involved in the criminal justice system in the newspapers. In Holland, where I was born, identities of accused and even convicted people are never published. If it were up to me Canada would follow the dutch example, but I realize that’s asking for a huge change. That said, I would love to see a discussion about those cases where people are merely charged with a crime. Do we really need to know their names?

People imprisoned at the Ottawa-Carleton Detention Centre (OCDC) are conducting a hunger strike after the jail failed to honour the agreement that brought a previous hunger strike to an end on June 4. This is a letter in support of their efforts by the people engaged in the 2018 Burnside prison strike.

Martha Paynter, Keisha Jefferies and Leah Carrier: “Nursing has a long history of complicity in exclusion, oppression, and exploitation of BIPOC. Changing that course requires abolitionist action, and the 2020 International Year of the Nurse and Midwife should be devoted to that change.”

The joint housing initiative between John Howard, Elizabeth Fry Mainland and Coverdale that has supported 34 people who have exited jail during the pandemic is being shut down as of June 30 as the federal funding has ended. Despite the groups’ best efforts we have received no commitment from the provincial government. Sara Tessier is a peer support worker for the project and has penned this op/ed.

News release: Today, The Canadian Association of Elizabeth Fry Societies (CAEFS) – along with the Atlantic Elizabeth Fry Societies – have learned that a former Correctional Officer at the Nova Institution for Women was arrested and charged with 6 counts of sexual assault, 6 counts of breach of trust, and 1 count of trying to procure sexual service – all related to his work at the Institution.