On Oct. 13 last year RCMP officers stood by as 200 people interfered with Mi’kmaw fisherfolk. That mob was 200 individuals that did not appear out of thin fog. They ate their supper, put on their coats and boots and no one stopped them at the door. Fathers didn’t stop their foolish sons. Mothers turned the other way and sisters nodded to get approval. Church leaders knew. Teachers knew. Neighbors turned on neighbors whose histories are still as tangled as the fishing twine of the sinking lobster traps.

Margie Ann Cook, speaking for many Mi’kmaq women, strongly opposes the construction of a man camp housing up to 5,000 construction workers hired to build the Goldboro LNG processing facility, storage tanks and marine works in Guysborough County. This despite Pieridae’s claim of Mi’kmaq support for the project.

“I still have relationship building and learning to do around how to be a better ally, but being open to discomfort is a good start. As long as I’m living and growing on stolen land, I need to be actively working to address that fact.”
Reporter Paul Wartman speaks with Jessie and Rebecca MacInnis of the Spring Tide Farm about the complex connections between settler farmers, land, and Indigenous sovereignty.

In mid-October, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) seized around 200 lobster traps from Mi’kmaq fishers in Unama’ki (Cape Breton, Nova Scotia). “It’s a struggle for them. They’re not making a lot of money, but it’s not about the money,” Bernadette Marshall told Robin Tress “It’s about the treaty right, and we’ve waited long enough.”

“The enemy of a healthy fishery is not the Mi’kmaq, but corporate profiteers like Mayer-Murphy and Risley who are bent on depleting this resource and resisting Mi’kmaq treaty rights. The Mi’kmaq fishery deserves our full support, while the corporate fishery should be shut down,” writes Chris Frazer.

This weekend we present All eyes on Mi’kma’ki, an excellent documentary short on Sipekne’katik fishers’ struggle to assert their treaty rights and establish a moderate livelihood fishery to support the community.

Saturday, Sept 26, 11am, Halifax Waterfront (by the big wave)

Mi’kmaw fishers are currently under attack by angry non-indigenous fishers who mistakingly claim that Mi’kmaw fisheries have no basis in Canadian law. Come out to show solidarity with Mi’kmaq people earning a moderate livelihood through the fishery!