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News brief: Hundreds of Haligonians come out to buy treaty lobsters

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KJIPUKTUK (Halifax) – “I am so excited to see you all here to experience the very first Mi’kmaw self-regulated treaty sale in Nova Scotia,” Dr. Cheryl Maloney of Sipekne’katik told Haligonians looking to pick up some treaty lobster.

The sale occurred this morning in front of Province House, with a long line-up extending all the way around the corner. 

In the past buyers of lobster caught by Mi’kmaq fishers exercising their treaty right have been charged under a provincial regulation. 

Today’s event was organized to highlight the existence of this regulation. How can Mi’kmaq exercise their legal right  to fish and trade outside of the Department of Fisheries & Oceans licensing regime if such trade is deemed illegal, the fishers ask.

The self-regulated fishery is conducted while under attack by several hundred white commercial fishers in Digby County who have engaged in racist mob attacks and other shameful acts of violence.  

The Mi’kmaq fishers have seen their boats burned down, their traps pulled, cars set on fire, tires slashed and so forth, while RCMP has been reluctant to step in. 

Today’s event made clear that many Nova Scotians don’t condone these acts of terror.

See also: “Moderate livelihood is not an illegal fishery” – Mi’kmaq fishermen question if reconciliation is real

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18 Comments

    1. Thank You ever so much for stepping-up to support Mi’kmaq, in this horrific racist incident.
      We are watching from BC .
      Shame, Shame, Shame; Oceans and Fisheries for allowing this to escalate so shamefully.
      Where’s the legal system; afraid to get in the middle? Afraid to justify what’s “right” and what’s “wrong?”
      Where’s the Federal Government? Standing by watch? No commitment? Keeping your hands clean, hoping for racist votes?
      Like I said…shame, shame, shame!

      Reply
  1. Glad to hear of it. Recognition of criminalization of Treaty rights is long time coming. Just learning of Treaties and Treaty rights are long time coming, if we were to ask. Lots of hate and prejudice to undo across Canada, to show many people`s true heart towards Indigenous Nations wanting to earn a moderate livelihood. Nothing wrong with that. And it was never intended to be as such. The development of common courtesy and respect should also be on the menu, as well as speaking up and denouncing racism when it occurs. Peace, friendship and respect. Sounds good to me.

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  2. I would like to buy and donate a lobster to someone in that line. Shipping to the NWT, I suppose would be expensive. I bet others would like to do the same.

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  3. This week I heard a Nova Scotia official saying they could do nothing about the conflict because it was federal jurisdiction. Odd (but not odd) to hear there is provincial law that criminalizes the sale of treaty lobsters. This is how priviledge is reinforced and maintained. Well done lobster buyers! I 🦞🦞🦞🦞

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  4. I think there should be a go fund me , to help out the natives, in rebuilding what was burnt down, cars burnt n boats. Time to rebuild what was torn down in seconds

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  5. This is amazing! Do you know if it’s possible to buy them across the country? No worries if not! I just know I’m not purchasing any without knowing who’s directly catching them.

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