Wednesday, 21 August 2019

More in our interview series on the state of journalism in Nova Scotia. I talk with APTN’s Angel Moore about doing journalism for a mostly Indigenous audience. “It’s not my job to change preconceptions. It’s my job to tell stories about the community for the community. However, when I’m writing a story, the potential negative comments and the racist comments on social media are always on my mind. I’m very aware and I’m very careful of that.”

In a few days our government is planning to deport another Somali refugee who never got his citizenship because of government neglect. Abdilahi Elmi came to Canada as a refugee at age 10. At 13, Ontario Child Welfare apprehended Elmi from his mother. At that point child welfare was the only entity that could legally apply for Elmi’s citizenship—it never did.

While many Nova Scotians were preparing to watch the Perseid meteor showers, some 25 Haligonians gathered in a backyard to hear Michael Lynk, the UN’s Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the Palestinian Territory, discuss what’s going on in Gaza, and in Palestine/Israel.

Here is yet another story by Kendall Worth about housing and poverty. Rose has learning disabilities and may have to move out of the place she loves as it is becoming more difficult for her ageing parents to support her.

I interviewed Joan Baxter, author of The Mill, and all round excellent reporter. We talked to Joan about bringing her African experience to Nova Scotia, what’s good and not so good about journalism here, the dangers of too much skepticism, the walls governments build around information, why give up your weekend to sit behind a computer, and much more. “That’s the very long story about how I got to be old and cranky,” Baxter said.