Tuesday, 23 October 2018

About 80 people rallied this afternoon at the the Maritime Centre, home of the Department of Labour and Advanced Education. They were there to protest anti-Black racism in workplaces anywhere, and especially to support Nhlanhla Dlamini, the young Black man shot with a high velocity nail gun by a co-worker employed with PQ Properties Limited of New Glasgow, Nova Scotia on September 18. The man who shot Dlamini should be charged with attempted murder and hate crimes, rally organizers say.

Raymond Sheppard, representing African Nova Scotian City workers, and members of Equity Watch held a joint press conference to argue that in terms of bullying and racism there is no political will among senior management to truly address the issues, and that it is time for an independent third party, like the City’s Auditor General, to hold an inquiry.

Everything you should know about gold mining in Nova Scotia, the harm it does to the environment and the politicians who make it all possible, in this very good documentary by Cliff Seruntine.

We talk with Dr. Ellen Hickey about how in Nova Scotia we give up way too easily on people with dementia. “When it comes to long term care, all you hear is doctors, drugs, nurses. What about the rest of the team? There is all kinds of know-how that will help keep people off these drugs, that will keep them out of the doctor’s office. Isn’t that what it is all about?”

NSGEU news release on this morning’s announcement that QEII redevelopment, which include the eventual decommissioning of part of the Victoria General site and the construction of five new health care buildings in the Halifax area, will be using a P3 model. “This government has chosen the most expensive way to get this project done,” said NSGEU President Jason MacLean.

With Nova Scotia now officially the province with the lowest minimum wage in the country, some 100 folks gathered at Dalhousie University’s  Killam Library this afternoon to demand a raise in the minimum wage, better working conditions altogether, as well as higher social assistance rates. Here is what community activist Lynn Jones told the protesters.

This weekend’s weekend video is Missing Women”, based on a stunning poem by Mad poet and filmmaker Anna Quon. The poem lists some of the ways women have gone missing from history, culture and their own lives, and names some of those women and girls to help us remember them. You really should watch this.

Feeling the pressure of increased public scrutiny, the Canada-Nova Scotia Offshore Petroleum Board (CNSOPB) met this afternoon with municipal councillors from western Nova Scotia, hoping to convince them that offshore oil exploration is safe. Don’t be fooled, says Marion Moore, of the Campaign to Protect Offshore Nova Scotia. “I would tell them that they’re being fed a big story from an organization that is completely captured by the oil industry,”  Moore tells the Nova Scotia Advocate.