Monday, 22 April 2019

With the recent injunction, the forcible removal of the grandmothers from the river site, altogether the total disregard for Treaty rights, and yesterday the mean-spirited destruction of the straw-bale house, it may look as if the water protectors are fighting a losing battle. However, looks are deceiving, and Alton Gas has its own share of problems.

Ever since the Wortley report came out almost all the discussion has focused on street checks and whether to ban or regulate them.

What about rampant racism among the force as reported in Wortley’s community meetings? What about classism, sexism and ableism we continue to hear about? And why do we think the same old and tired recommendations are going to work this time?

In 2019 all income assistance recipients in Nova Scotia stand to lose a good chunk of buying power to inflation. In 2020, when people on income assistance finally get a raise, that raise in most cases gets eaten up by inflation, and then some.

In other news, Community Services spent millions less on welfare payments last year than it anticipated.

Many Nova Scotians with intellectual and physical disabilities continue to live in large institutions against their will, while others are being taken care of by ageing and senior parents. Affected people are saying enough is enough. We went to today’s press conference at Province House, and transcribed in full the powerful statements by Jeannie Whidden of People First Nova Scotia, and Jen Powley, of No More Warehousing.