Elizabeth Glenn-Copeland at Law Amendments in response to the (severely watered-down) Biodiversity Act (Bill 4): “We implore you to do your job as policymakers and exercise the power given to you as public servants with pride, knowing you are acting in the best interests of all Nova Scotians, of the Living Earth. This act is the first of its kind in Canada. Let’s make Nova Scotia a leader in a time when such leadership is critical.”

Marian Whitcomb on the need for an undiluted Biodiversity Act. “Passing this act is not a path to government overreach. It is the only path to saving our forests from what is to come. If we give no one the responsibility and the authority to protect our greatest treasure…no one will do the hard stuff. Our traditional native food sources are diminishing fast, and not just in the forests.”

Weekend video: A construction and demolition debris facility on North Mountain, not far from Bridgetown, is located in a wetland that feeds springs and local wells. The site contains asbestos and autofluff, and local residents are having a hard time getting the department of Environment’s attention.

Designating the Ingram River Wilderness Area near St. Margaret’s Bay will protect some of the most pristine publicly owned forests and waterways from logging and industrial activities. The process has reached a stage where the province is looking for public input. It’s important that we show the politicians we care, Helga Guderley, a member of the St. Margaret’s Bay Stewardship Association tells me.

Very pleased to post the brief but well-argued Save our Seas and Shores submission in response to the Northern Pulp proposal to dump its effluent pipe into the Northumberland Strait. “Northern Pulp’s focus report reads as if they are dumping into pristine waters, rather than the deeply degraded fragile ecosystem the Northumberland Strait and Gulf of St Lawrence have now become in 2019,” write Mary Gorman and Percy Hayne.