Sunday, 17 February 2019

Scott Neigh’s weekly podcast is a wonderful thing, and Scott is a kind man who always allows us to share an interview whenever the topic has a Nova Scotia relevance. Here he speaks with North Preston and Nort End community activist LaMeia Reddick, and Ted Rutland, author of Displacing Blackness: Planning, Power, and Race in Twentieth-Century Halifax, a must-read for anybody interested in urban planning and / or the history of the struggle against racism in Halifax. It’s a book I simply can’t recommend enough.

This weekend we present a short documentary produced by distinguished filmmaker, drummer, teacher and author Catherine Martin about the first Idle No More event in Nova Scotia, on December 14, 2012 at the Grand Parade across from City Hall in Halifax.   

This weekend’s weekend video features an interview with Delvina Bernard, one of the founders of Four the Moment, the excellent and unabashedly political a capella band that appeared at many rallies and events in Nova Scotia throughout the eighties.

News release: Please visit the Acadia Art Gallery over the period April 5th to 12th to see an exploration of the Black Press tradition in Nova Scotia in the small gallery space. The exhibit, put together by recent Acadia graduate Sawyer Carnegie, is titled “The Nova Scotia Black Press Tradition: Resisting through Print.”  

Poverty activist and frequent contributor Brenda Thompson writes about adults only buildings and the law. She was one of the activists who, in the early 1980s, brought about changes that make discrimination based on source of income (welfare) and age (whether you have children) illegal. Landlords openly break that law all the time, and the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission just sits back.