Friday, 22 November 2019

Historian and Halifax Poet Laureate Afua Cooper on the lack of visible recognition of Black history in Halifax, and why some kind of memorialization of the many contributions of the Jamaican Maroons would be a good way to start filling that void.

A CBC story reporting on the fight of Lucasville residents to get the city to deal with a horse farm that they say smells up the neighborhood never mentions the community’s ancient African Nova Scotian roots. Many people in Lucasville have been vocal about their opinion that race is an important piece of the puzzle if you want to understan what is really going on here.

Eternal Life: Preserving the Memory of Beechville is a reflective look at how one African Nova-Scotian community is coping with urban sprawl encroaching on its borders. Following the war of 1812, a group of freed slaves settled in Beechville, Nova Scotia as refugees escaping the United States. Almost two centuries later, as urbanization threatens many of Canada’s rural communities, Beechville itself is being swallowed up.