Wednesday, 11 December 2019

Press release: Recently, Dr. Lynn Jones and two elders of the Black community in Truro were racially profiled when they were approached and questioned by police while watching deer on the side of the road near Jones’ home.

This incident demonstrates the problem of racial profiling and the negative relationship that exists between police and the black community is a provincial wide issue.

Dr. Lynn Jones was questioned by Truro police when she stopped to watch deer, right in the historic African Nova Scotian Truro neighborhood where her family has lived for many generations. “Please add me to the list of African Nova Scotians who are constantly being racially profiled in this province for no valid reason and while you’re at it, give your constituents in Truro and your Town police a lesson in white privilege , anti Black racism and the history of the founding people of our province and Truro,” she writes in an open letter to Truro’s mayor.

With Nova Scotia now officially the province with the lowest minimum wage in the country, some 100 folks gathered at Dalhousie University’s  Killam Library this afternoon to demand a raise in the minimum wage, better working conditions altogether, as well as higher social assistance rates. Here is what community activist Lynn Jones told the protesters.

Gottingen Street, one of Halifax main thoroughfares, used to extend into the far North End. But in 1981 Halifax Council voted that the northern segment of Gottingen Street, beyond the Young Street intersection, now be called Novalea Drive. The reasons behind that decision were tainted by racism and prejudice, and a survey of residents’ opinions conducted by the City purposely excluded most residents who lived along the street. Maybe it’s time to make things right again.