Tuesday, 10 December 2019

Mi’kmaq Grandmother Elizabeth Marshall wrote the following open letter to Premier Stephen McNeil on the occasion of the introduction of Bill 213, the Sustainable Development Goals Act.

“The so called province of Nova Scotia has distributed hundreds of illegal land grants to promote settlement for the crown in the last 200 years. Generations of your tax paying families have prospered and built equity off the lands stolen from my family.”

Many different groups have challenged Mi’kmaw sovereignty over A’Se’k and the area around it, and for centuries, the Mi’kmaq have resisted and protected their homeland. Historian Colin Osmond describes how today’s Mi’kmaq protectors of A’se’k walk in the footsteps and shadows of generations of Mi’kmaq who have done the same.

Darryl Leroux offers this introduction to his research into claims of Indigenous identity by so called Acadian or Eastern Métis, based on very questionable ancestry. A book he’s written on the topic is in stores now, and I can’t wait to read it.

Today, the RCMP moved to enforce an injunction on behalf of Alton Gas (a subsidiary of Alberta-based AltaGas) against Mi’kmaq water protectors at the Shubenacadie River. They arrested Mi’kmaq grandmothers, and have blocked others from accessing the site.

Join us at the legislature to make a public show of solidarity against this clear violation of the treaties of Peace and Friendship.

Most news organizations in Nova Scotia refer to the Alton Gas water protectors as protesters. I suspect many journalists and editors gravitate to the term protesters because it feels like the more neutral term. The problem is, when you take a closer look, you will find it’s not so neutral after all.

This weekend we present a short documentary produced by distinguished filmmaker, drummer, teacher and author Catherine Martin about the first Idle No More event in Nova Scotia, on December 14, 2012 at the Grand Parade across from City Hall in Halifax.   

Nova Scotia indie filmmaker Ann Verrall often makes movies and documentaries collaborating with youths , and she’s really good at it. What’s with that Treaty? is a great example. The video was made by students of We’koqma’q Mi’kmaq School in Cape Breton during a 5-day video intensive. Students document Treaty Day activities, Orange Shirt Day, meet with elders Joe Googoo, Magit Poulette, Ben Sylliboy, and Malglit Pelletier, and explore Treaty Education. Students also talk about the impact of residential school on them.