Margie Ann Cook, speaking for many Mi’kmaq women, strongly opposes the construction of a man camp housing up to 5,000 construction workers hired to build the Goldboro LNG processing facility, storage tanks and marine works in Guysborough County. This despite Pieridae’s claim of Mi’kmaq support for the project.

The Mi’kmaw Native Friendship Centre opened in 1973 in Halifax, as a welcoming place for Indigenous people to gather and seek support and solace. Almost 50 years on, it remains a lively vibrant place, a landmark in the North End of Halifax, and a partner in Creating Communities of Care, a project to support urban Indigenous and African Nova Scotian women who have experienced violence.

“I still have relationship building and learning to do around how to be a better ally, but being open to discomfort is a good start. As long as I’m living and growing on stolen land, I need to be actively working to address that fact.”
Reporter Paul Wartman speaks with Jessie and Rebecca MacInnis of the Spring Tide Farm about the complex connections between settler farmers, land, and Indigenous sovereignty.

What happens when a Mi’kmaw and settler university student share car rides on their way to university and other places? They talk, and the settler learns some hard lessons about colonial oppression, systemic racism and white privilege. “One Saturday afternoon when we happened to be together, Flo shared a very personal story about why she finds it difficult to eat when she is in a social food sharing situation.”