News release: “On Monday, March 5th, from 2pm-6pm, Nova Scotians will gather at the Provincial Legislature to once again try to make their voices heard. Women’s March Canada and Equal Voice Nova Scotia are partnering with educators, parents, and administrators to ask the Government of Nova Scotia to pause Bill 72 and take time to consult before implementing changes to the education system.” 

Former firefighter and justice fighter for ever Liane Tessier speaks at the Halifax Women’s March about her 12-year battle with HRM and the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission. “For me, coming forward, speaking out, has been the sanest thing I have ever done in my life, no matter how many people try to shut me up. Remaining silent is guaranteed only to change nothing at all.”

Applied to current events, no march on Saturday will be better than any other. However, ensuring that there are marches in rural as well as urban areas is crucial in signifying both difference in lived experience and togetherness in the struggle for female empowerment, writes Lori Oliver. She then takes a closer look at two key problems for women in rural Nova Scotia are difficulties accessing abortion services and a higher rate of domestic, intimate partner violence—both of which disastrously intersect with how women continue to earn, on average, 87 cents to men’s $1. Barriers faced by racialized groups are even more severe.

As a bit of a follow-up on last winter’s very successful Women’s March on Washington here in Halifax about three hundred women and allies gathered at Province House today at noon to remind the world they’re still here. We hope to do a bit more on today’s rally, but for now, here are a couple of photos, and El Jones’ contribution, on Nova Scotia’s women who live in poverty, published with her kind permission.