Thursday, 23 May 2019

Judy Haiven looks back on the racist reign of terror at Halifax Transit. How could this reign of terror go on for 14 plus years? How could a Black man become unemployed and then die due to the stress of living with the anger and threats directed at him by racist co-workers? How could a white man and his Black wife receive such soul-destroying treatment for the mere crime of loving each other? When will anyone step up to explain what happened and how it won’t happen again?

Last Friday Judy Haiven joined the march and tribute to Tanya Brooks, the Mi’kmaq woman who was murdered 10 yeasr ago in Halifax. “Given recent reluctance by the Halifax police to end street checks and apologise for their racism, race likely played a role in their unforgivably slow investigation,” Haiven writes.

Judy Haiven questions why police and reporters broadcast the release of a man deemed a high-risk offender who has completed his sentence. “I’m no expert in this matter of crime and punishment. But it can’t be good to target, name and shame ex-cons in our midst. After all, 95% of people in prison do get released. They have to walk and live among us.”

It’s not just the hastily cancelled entirely white panel on diversity, Saint Mary’s University has a long history of not taking a meaningful stand on diversity and human rights, former SMU professor Judy Haiven writes.

Imagine being 28-years-old and not being able to decide what you are going to eat for dinner—or breakfast or lunch. Imagine having to live with people who scare or threaten you. Imagine living down a hallway from someone who sexually assaulted you, and you are told not to make a fuss. All this can and does happen to people with severe physical disabilities who must live in nursing homes in Nova Scotia. Judy Haiven on the need for community living options for people with severe physical disabilities.

Judy Haiven on Trudeau’s apology yesterday to the African Nova Scotian youths who were profiled while visiting the Parliament building in Ottawa.

Letter by Judy Haiven on the court case of Shawn Wade Hynes of Pictou County, accused of shooting Nhlanhia  Dlamini in the back with a nail gun on a construction site “Is it just my imagination or a usual practice that when someone who is criminally charged does not show up for court, the judge issues a bench warrant?”