A story I wrote in 2014, in my Halifax Media Co-op days, but sadly still relevant as BP will start exploratory drilling this spring or summer. I attended the Halifax town hall meeting last night, there will probably be more on this in the NS Advocate in the next little while. Meanwhile, read about corexit as the first line of defense against oil spills, and be afraid. Be very afraid.

In this news release Sierra Club Atlantic and the Council of Canadians respond to the Muskrat Falls inquiry announced earlier this week. “There are real concerns with the safety of this dam, and the threat of methylmercury poisoning for all generations to come. The Methylmercury Agreement from last fall by the Premier and leaders of the three Indigenous communities must be honoured, but the project must be put on hold in order for that to happen.”

Roberta Benefiel, founding director of  Grand Riverkeeper, Labrador, is visiting Nova Scotia to remind us that for the people who live there Muskrat Falls is an environmental disaster that will poison traditional food sources and flood indigenous lands. She believes that through the Maritime Link this is Nova Scotia issue as well. “There may not be that many of us, but people do live here. We need to put a face to these people,” Benefiel tells the Nova Scotia Advocate.

The Muskrat Falls development may be far away in Labrador, but it is very much Nova Scotia’s business. That was the message delivered by speakers at a news conference held outside the Emera / Nova Scotia Power offices on Lower Water Street in downtown Halifax this morning. “What we are seeing is massive destruction and genocide for profit. The crown corporation Nalcor is giving itself the legal authority to commit genocide using water as a vehicle for devastation. Once they drown the landscape, methylmercury poisoning is inevitable.  We are talking mass genocide to all vegetation, medicines and all living species. Lives will be lost,” said Michelle Paul.

The 2007 decision not to approve the Whites Point Quarry in Digby Neck is still not entirely settled. Now the Canadian government is appealing a NAFTA decision that withholding environmental approval was unjustified. Let’s make sure that the government fights this case, rather than settle, there is too much at stake, says Gretchen Fitzgerald of the Sierra Club Atlantic.