Tuesday, 11 December 2018

The Mi’kmaq often refer to Black Ash wood as white gold: It’s the perfect material for basket-making, but now that the Emerald Ash Borer has arrived on the east coast, the Black Ash is in danger of disappearing entirely in Nova Scotia. Quentin Kerr investigates these new threats to the Black Ash tree, and how Mi’kmawey Forestry, imbued with the spirit of Netukulimk, is doing what it can to preserve the species.

This is big! Together with the Nova Scotia College of Social Workers we are commissioning one in-depth story on a poverty-related topic. We want to hear from both professional writers and from people who write from lived experience. Thanks to the generous support of the NSCSW we are able to pay between $500 and $750, depending on the complexity of the topic and how experienced a writer you are. Send us your pitch!

Stacey Dlamini, mother of the young Black man shot with a high-velocity nail gun, writes about racism and complicity, “I wonder how the story might have turned out had someone on Nhlanhla’s crew said to the person who shot him, “Hey, why don’t you leave the kid alone?” What if they’d come up to Nhlanhla and said, “You know man, you don’t have to accept this kind of treatment. Let’s do something about it together.” What if someone had shown him some compassion or solidarity? Or even in the aftermath, some empathy? This experience would feel different for us.”

“Nova Scotians must project into the future and realize the consequences resulting from the industrial actions of the multinational corporations who appear to be salivating over what Nova Scotia’s governments might be willing to offer,” writes Guysborough resident Ray Bates.

Check out this weekend’s Weekend video, We story the land, a documentary by the always excellent Martha Stiegman (and co-produced and directed by Sherry Pictou) that follows seven paddlers from L’sitkuk (Bear River First Nation) as they travel inland following almost forgotten traditional Mi’kmaq canoe routes. It’s really good.