Tuesday, 10 December 2019

News release: The Campaign to Protect Offshore Nova Scotia (CPONS) calls for an open public meeting with media present so all Nova Scotians can hear clearly from the Canada Nova Scotia Offshore Petroleum Board (CNSOPB) the rationale behind their project review and licensing process.

As we write this the BP commissioned rig West Aquarius is on its way to the Scotian Shelf to start exploratory drilling for oil, something John Davis, director of the Clean Ocean Action Committee, very much wished wouldn’t happen. We interviewed Davis about how federal and provincial regulators are way too close to the oil and gas industry, how environmental and fisheries groups are ignored, and why we should care about what happens on the Scotian Shelf.

News release by the Offshore Alliance: “Instead of holding public hearings, which should be required before industry projects are given the go-ahead, the CNSOPB through its PR staff suggested on short notice a facilitated 45 minute “sharing circle” for all 8-12 invited “stakeholder groups.”

News release issued by the Offshore Alliance: “While there are some improvements in overall environmental assessment processes in Liberal legislation tabled today in Ottawa, the draft Bill is a  step backwards with respect to offshore oil and gas in Atlantic Canada, appears to give oil and gas boards more authority, and points to federal concessions in response to lobbying from the provinces and oil industry.”

Shell Canada and other large energy corporations basically get their way with our oceans, regulation is a farce and risks are ignored. That’s the opinion of a new South Shore organization, the Campaign to Protect Offshore Nova Scotia. It has some suggestions on how to fix the problem.