Sunday, 16 June 2019

Last week Mi’kmaw Water Protectors traveled to Antigonish to confront politicians attending the annual meeting of the provincial Liberals about federal efforts to accommodate the Alton Gas Project. Sadie Beaton explains what is going on. Video by Eliza Knockwood included

A new documentary, The shadow of Gold, about gold mining in Canada and world-wide, will be shown this Tuesday at the Central Library in Halifax. With gold mining on the increase in Nova Scotia ,we feature the documentary’s trailer and highly recommend that you check it out.

Media release: A coalition of fishers, fish plant operators and workers, tourism operators, scientists, environmental organizations and communities will be delivering a message to a Senate committee that is meeting in Halifax this week – the Canada-Nova Scotia Offshore Petroleum Board (CNSOPB) can’t be both a regulator and a promoter of offshore oil and gas drilling.

Media release: In recently released documents accessed through Access to Information and Freedom of Information legislation, Water Protectors have learned that Alton Gas’ current plan to release high concentration brine into the Sipekne’katik/ Shubenacadie River would be out of compliance with Environment and Climate Change Canada’s (ECCC’s) general prohibition on the release of deleterious substances into waterways where fish frequent. Also attached the documents the news release refers to. Stay tuned for more on this.

The Nova Scotia Utilities and Review Board is deciding whether to extend a construction permit for the Alton Gas underground storage caverns to 2023. Some 60 interested parties submitted comments in writing. What happens next, and how the Board reaches its decision is anybody’s guess. This secrecy and lack of dialogue is not a good thing, given the controversies and complexities surrounding the project.

As CBC’s Paul Withers reported yesterday Clearwater Seafood left thousands of lobster traps in the water for longer than the 72 hours allowed by law.
We’re not talking an extra day here because of bad weather. Sometimes baited and unbaited traps would be left on the ocean floor for as long as 98 days at a time, and this environmentally unsound practice has been going on at least since 2014. Breaking the law this way saved the company huge amounts of money. We talked with Shannon Arnold of the Ecology Action Centre to find out more, and what she told us is pretty alarming.