Monday, 23 September 2019

“If ever there was a case that was cut and dry this is it. If the Nova Scotia Justice system fails Nhlanhla in their decision and do not hold Nhlahla’s abuser accountable for the damage his crimes have caused it will be a significant miscarriage of justice in our province.”

Angela (Angee) Bowden reflects on 400 years of slavery and the upcoming trial of Shawn Hynes, accused of shooting a pellet gun at his Black fellow worker Nhlanhla Dlamini.

A poem by Angela “Angee” Bowden, to remember that this month 400 years ago slaves first arrived in North America.

When the past is my present
And my scars still remain
And our lives still don’t matter
I am living in that pain

Angela Bowden on growing up Black in Nova Scotia. “You do not belong here” became the name of the unfamiliar place where I lived, churning my stomach for as long as I can remember. It was as if I had arrived on a foreign planet and even though I spoke the language of its inhabitants, it still felt forced, unnatural, uncomfortable and entirely unfamiliar.”

Angela Bowden remembers growing up Black in rural Nova Scotia, and reflects on the enduring damage done by abusive police practices over the generations. “I vividly recall, as do many of my peer group, police officers slowly driving by us numerous times, following us as we walk, asking us our names, where we are going, where we are coming from, and who our parents were.”

Earlier this week we reported on the Halifax rally in support of Nhlanhla Dlamini, the young Black man shot with a high velocity nail gun by a co-worker. Here is a transcription of an excellent speech delivered by Angie Bowden at that rally, wherein she addresses the impact of such racist acts on the entire Black community in Nova Scotia, and especially also on its youths.