We talk with disability activist Gus Reed about (successfully) taking the NS Human Rights Commission to court, and why the Commission appears so reluctant to fight on behalf of people whose human rights have been breached. “I think there is a reluctance to take on tough issues that involve systemic problems. I also don’t think they like to take on the government,” says Reed.

The Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission is taking the lead in a narrow investigation into carding by Halifax police. An expert will be hired to determine if discrimination actually occurs. Meanwhile Black people will continue to be targeted.

Black activists write a letter asking that carding be stopped, and nobody in power wants to talk about it. No way, says the chief of police. Can’t have politicians telling the police what to do, says Stephen McNeil. “Fix the tool, don’t throw out the toolbox,” says mayor Savage.

A complaint by a group of welfare recipients who live with disabilities and require special diets is going to court this Thursday. Their special needs allowances have not kept up with ever rising costs, they say, and they want to force the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission to conduct a tribunal.

“Sobeys regrets that this matter has taken so long to come to a conclusion.” That’s the best Sobeys can come up with in terms of apology in a recent racial profiling case. By skillfully exploiting flaws in Human Rights legislation Sobeys almost got away with racism. Good thing Ms. Andrella David and the residents of Upper Hammonds Plains had other ideas.