Tuesday, 22 January 2019

Alex Kronstein on supports for children with autism in the education system: “When it comes to inclusive education, it is a well-known fact that EPAs and other school support staff do not have anything close to adequate training to provide support for autistic kids. There are training modules developed by actually autistic people that could give EPAs and support workers a whole new perspective.”

Many parents of autistic children are told about the EIBI program, and that it’s extremely important that their children receive it so they can have a good future. And they almost always accept this advice without question. But there are other options that are not based in Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA), and that are non-pathologizing, e.g. that do not assume that there is something fundamentally wrong with the child. Alex Kronstein takes a look at one such option.

Alex Kronstein on the unspoken assumption that caregivers, parents, etc. always have the best of intentions for those they are responsible for, no questions asked. Also how this manifests, and what to do about it. A great article with lots to think about. We’re so pleased to have Alex write for us and offer us his unique perspectives on these matters.

Oral speech may not be the best method of communication for the non-speaking autistic, writes Alex Kronstein. “Mainstream autism organizations are unwilling to admit that they are choosing to ignore non-speaking autistics.  Non-speaking autistics have always been around, just like autistics who do use oral speech. And everyone – the medical and psychological professionals, the non-autistic parents, the mainstream media – needs to STOP pathologizing non-speaking autistics and using functioning labels.”

More people who live with disabilities are unemployed, and that opens the door to all kinds of exploitation. Throw some preconceptions about these workers in the mix (so loyal, so productive, menial jobs only) and what we end up with is a complicated mess, writes Alex Kronstein.