Thursday, 24 January 2019

Scott Neigh, through his weekly Talking Radical podcast, provides a centre stage to activists, their causes, and the how and why of their strategic approaches. Scott always kindly allows me to repost a podcast if it is of particular relevance to Nova Scotia Advocate readers. Earlier we featured his eye opening interview with El Jones on organizing vulnerable prison populations and the responsibilities that brings, and an interview with water protectors Dorene Bernard and Rebecca Moore on the mess that is Alton Gas. This week we present Scott’s interview with Marilyn Keddy and Peter Puxley of the Campaign to Protect Offshore Nova Scotia,, about the threat of offshore oil exploration to climate change and fisheries, and about the challenges of organizing in rural Nova Scotia.

In 1965, prior to the construction of the Boat Harbour treatment facility, the Nova Scotia Water Authority, representing the provincial government, assured upset members of the Pictou Landing First Nation that the lagoon would remain suitable for boating, and even that fresh-water fish could be introduced. The only time there would be a bit of a smell would be in spring as the ice in the lagoon was breaking up, community members were told.

Martyn Williams continues his common sense campaign to increase safety for pedestrians, wheelchair users and cyclists. “Road users need infrastructure which does not let them down and allows them to complete their journeys safely and without injury to themselves and others. With the rate of incidents we have on our roads per day, we need the budget and will to make that happen now.”

Two things we can learn from that record-setting oil spill off the coast of Newfoundland. Storms in the North Atlantic are something else, and government oversight of the offshore in Newfoundland is very lax. The really scary part? Nova Scotia oversight is no different. And Newfoundland’s stormy ocean is Nova Scotia’s stormy ocean.