Martyn Williams, on behalf of the group HRM Safe Streets for Everyone, is writing a Councillors survival guide to safer streets and traffic, part 1 of which we are happy to publish here on the Nova Scotia Advocate site. It targets mayor and council hopefuls, but it is also useful to residents as it sets out the issues, and what councillors can do to resolve them. It’s a comprehensive guide, and, much like Martyn’s articles, the product of meticulous research.

John McCracken on the PC’s provincial election win in New Brunswick: “You could practically hear the cheering from the corporate head office of Irving Oil at 10 King Square South in Saint John, New Brunswick.”

Alton Gas likes to brag about the soundness of its plans and its willingness to share information with stakeholders. However, if it weren’t for Rachael Greenland-Smith and Dale Poulette, two stubborn citizen-researchers, we would never have seen evidence that the federal department of Environment and Climate Change (ECC) point blank refused to approve the project as it is currently proposed.

In this weekend’s weekend video the PLANifax people make a good case for free transit in Halifax. Timely too, with municipal elections around the corner.

Martyn Williams: Seniors rely on walking or cycling for mobility because they may no longer drive for health reasons, or because it is the only way they can enjoy much needed exercise. But the infrastructure they use is built for vehicles to move quickly and easily, not to meet the safety requirements of vulnerable road users of all ages and abilities.

In this short 2018 video Molly Leblanc, a species at risk and biodiversity biologist with Coastal Action, talks about the roughly one million ounces of mercury left behind by mining companies in Nova Scotia, typically dumped in nearby wetlands.

“I’m starting with the little critters low on the food chain, wetland insects. What I found is that insects from these goldmine sites have mercury levels 50 times higher than insects from clean healthy wetlands. And in species like dragonflies and mayflies, which shed their skin, hatch in the water and fly away.”