KJIPUKTUK (Halifax) – During this horrible pandemic people who live with disabilities face unique challenges. Maybe you are self isolating but you can no longer rely on your homecare worker visiting regularly. Or maybe you are institutionalized, non-verbal and no longer able to communicate with staff because a caregiver you rely on is no longer allowed to visit. We talk with Sherry Costa, provincial coordinator for the Nova Scotia League for Equal Opportunities (NSLEO) about these and other issues.

Warren (Gus) Reed; “I wonder when Strang got hand washing religion. Four years ago, wheelchair users asked Strang to weigh in on enforcement of the province’s food safety regulation requiring “washroom facilities for staff and washroom facilities for the public available in a convenient location” in restaurants. He was indifferent:”

Letter: “We therefore urge you to mount a special initiative to increase the levels of qualified staff in all nursing homes and residential care facilities. Chronic underfunding and understaffing have been persistent problems for the long-term care sector. More than ever before, this is a time when all the necessary funding and levels of qualified staff should be in place for our long-term care facilities.”

Letter: The state of emergency recently declared in Nova Scotia in response to the COVID-19 pandemic raises many concerns, in particular that Black, Indigenous, and other racialized peoples, people living in poverty, and homeless, the mentally ill, and other vulnerable groups will not be disproportionately targeted.. We must embrace this crisis as an opportunity to develop and implement practices that produce inclusive and equitable public health and safety practices,