Sunday, 20 May 2018

We interview food security expert Dr. Valerie Tarasuk, who will be visiting Nova Scotia later this week. She talks about hunger counts that don’t count hunger, food banks that don’t solve food insecurity, and income thresholds that don’t reflect it. Also, why people who are food insecure get sick so much, even if the illness has nothing to do with diet. And finally, what we should do to fix the problem.

A private for-profit blood supply system is not welcome in Nova Scotia, and the provincial government should enact legislation as soon as possible to ensure private companies do not get to set up shop here. That was the main message at this morning’s press conference organized by unions, the Nova Scotia Health Coalition and Bloodwatch, an organization that advocates for a safe, voluntary, public blood system in Canada.

News release: The ACE (Advocates for the Care of the Elderly) Team is very disappointed that the new Provincial Budget does little to address long, overdue needs in long-term care.

According to ACE Team Chair, Gary MacLeod, “While this Budget is supposed to be about “Stronger Services and Supports”, this is clearly not being done for long-term care.  Expanding the Caregiver Benefit program or increasing the Seniors Safety grant program does little to improve or provide more long-term care”

This Friday at 7 PM the Maritime Museum will be hosting a live art show in honour of an enslaved black woman named Anarcha whose body was experimented upon in the 1800’s in order to find a treatment for obstetric fistula. We speak with Habiba Cooper Diallo, the driving force behind the event that features poet and historian Afua Cooper, Dartmouth painter Kim Cain, and spoken word artist Kilah Rolle.

Meet Sophia (not her real name), who lives with a painful illness, raises a son who lives with developmental disabilities, and does all that on a $156 monthly personal allowance, after rent and power bills are paid, and an arrears to Community Services is dealt with. Please let that sink in. $156 per month.  At the bottom of the story we tell you what you can do to help change this.