Thursday, 24 January 2019

Faith Cronin calls on Stephen McNeil to finally address the lack of community living opportunities for people with disabilities. “To our great shame, Nova Scotia has continued to profoundly exclude and discriminate against persons with disabilities. I call on you to immediately take the bold and ethical actions necessary to end this shameful Nova Scotian legacy.”

Many parents of autistic children are told about the EIBI program, and that it’s extremely important that their children receive it so they can have a good future. And they almost always accept this advice without question. But there are other options that are not based in Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA), and that are non-pathologizing, e.g. that do not assume that there is something fundamentally wrong with the child. Alex Kronstein takes a look at one such option.

You are invited to the Community Forum hosted by the Disability Rights Coalition to learn about the current status of services for persons with disabilities and their families. Nova Scotia has the highest rate per capita of those living with a disability in Canada and is one of the last provinces who have large segregated institutions who warehouse people because of their disability.

Two clips this weekend, to highlight two film festivals happening this week, one a mini one, the other a full blown festival, and both with an excellent line up. Kampung Tapir, a 17-minute short from Indonesia/Malaysia about migration, is part of this Tuesday’s screening presented by Mayworks’ Canadian Labour International Film Festival. Next we present a trailer for the full length Singing to Myself, about a young deaf woman living in Prince Edward Island and the precocious musician who comes into her life. That is one of the many gems offered by the Bluenose-Ability Film Festival, running from November 29 to December 3rd.  

Rebecca Hussman went to a talk by registered nurse and activist Martha Paynter about the shocking lack of health care for women in Nova Scotia prisons. Paynter dedicated her talk to two women who died while in Truro’s Nova Institution for Women in 2015: Veronica Park and Camille Strickland-Murphy. “… this is what happens when we inadequately care for people inside,” Paynter said.

This weekend’s weekend video features Halifax musician, photographer, stalwart activist and Nova Scotia Advocate author Paul Vienneau as he hands out bottled water on a hot Spring Garden day. ““This helped me see that giving away water has become part of what I am doing with my life. It’s an antidepressant in 24 little plastic bottles.”

A Nova Scotia Human Rights enquiry reached a crucial stage last Wednesday after closing statements were delivered by the Province of Nova Scotia, the respondent in the case. If the enquiry chair finds that the way government deals with housing needs of people with disabilities is indeed discriminatory, then, and only then, will there be a second phase, to determine  to what extent the Province must make changes in its policies and activities.