Tuesday, 23 July 2019

Cuts to the Early Literacy Support Program reveal how the educational establishment in Nova Scotia no longer believes in equal opportunity and inclusion, writes Nancy Spina, a former teacher and a parent of kids with disabilities.

Ever since the Wortley report came out almost all the discussion has focused on street checks and whether to ban or regulate them.

What about rampant racism among the force as reported in Wortley’s community meetings? What about classism, sexism and ableism we continue to hear about? And why do we think the same old and tired recommendations are going to work this time?

Recently Erica Lewis considered applying for membership in the National Advisory Council on Poverty. This is a group consisting of people with lived experience of poverty, who are tasked with providing input on the federal government’s poverty reduction strategy.

When Erica found out it wasn’t for her because of the nature and severity of her health issues, she wrote to the Feds.

“If you really want a diverse group of people giving input, you should
accommodate those who, because of illness, rarely leave their homes,” she writes.

Many Nova Scotians with intellectual and physical disabilities continue to live in large institutions against their will, while others are being taken care of by ageing and senior parents. Affected people are saying enough is enough. We went to today’s press conference at Province House, and transcribed in full the powerful statements by Jeannie Whidden of People First Nova Scotia, and Jen Powley, of No More Warehousing.