Thursday, 22 August 2019

ACORN Nova Scotia asked municipal candidates in North End Halifax, Dartmouth East, Dartmouth Centre and Spryfield where they stand on issues that matter to people who live in poverty. Things like affordable housing, slum landlords, and pay day loan sharks. Here are their responses.

Matthew Meisner, a young man who spent the last 12 years at a locked down unit within the Nova Scotia Hospital, recently had a pillowcase placed over his head by staff, his mother says. This is only the latest in a series of staff abuse complaints involving Matthew, as the Nova Scotia Advocate reported in March of this year.

Last week we reported that Mainline Needle Exchange in Halifax is facing a budget crunch, this week the news is that its Cape Breton counterpart may well close its doors early next year because the federal government is no longer funding the organization. Time for the province to step up to the plate.

Kendall Worth on the hard work that being on social assistance entails, and how you gain an assortment of valuable experiences that you should be able to list on your resume. We’re talking about skills like economical shopping, policy research and building community. And you have to be a real mathematical genius to make ends meet.

Mainline Needle Exchange, an organization that helps people who live with drug addictions in mainland Nova Scotia, can’t keep up with the demand, something the provincial government is trying hard to ignore. Lives are at stake. The Nova Scotia Advocate went to Mainline’s open house to find out more.