Wednesday, 11 December 2019

This story / interview was originally published on the Halifax Media Co-op website in April 2014. We are running it again because it’s a necessary reminder that the Muskrat Falls development affects multiple marginalized groups in Labrador and it clearly addresses Nova Scotia’s complicity through the Maritime Link.

600 people have died of drug overdoses in Nova Scotia in the last 10 years, and we only know this because of a leaked email. Imagine the uproar if these deaths didn’t affect drug addicts but nice middle class people. Instead we have two levels of governments cutting subsidies to organizations that are trying to keep such deaths to a minimum.

Meet Joanne (not her real name). Joanne lives in a mid-sized town somewhere in rural Nova Scotia with her three kids, two boys and one girl. Her teenage son has intellectual disabilities and requires special care. Several years ago she fled an abusive relationship and she has not yet been able to resume a public live, something most of us take for granted. She is on Income Assistance. “I am poor,” she says, “but I budget well.”

“To have a roof over your head and to not go hungry are fundamental human rights,” NDP leader Gary Burrill told the Nova Scotia Advocate to explain the party’s proposed amendments to the Human Rights Act. Lawyer Claire McNeil tells us why this would be a very significant change, and one that is long overdue.

Alton Gas is getting plenty of press coverage. However, that the proposed gas pipeline for the Alton Gas storage project is set to cross the Stewiacke River Wilderness Area has somehow escaped attention. It appears that the current government would like to keep it that way.