Martha Mutale: “I learned from my ancestors to always speak the truth. I go to bed every night anxious about how to house my caseload of people, how to combat microaggressions, how to enjoy my life with my partner, how to stay present even though I want to imagine a world without this much chaos, violence, and neglect.”

Ray Bates: Recognition of historical Mi’kmaq place-name should become a common practice exhibited by governments and communities. History cannot be changed but it can be truthfully recognized with positive outcomes via respectful actions.

I’ve always had a difficult time fitting in; never knowing where I belong in social circles. I have recently come to terms with the notion that I will always be a drifter… floating from crowd to crowd. Nevertheless, a pill I have yet to swallow is how hard it can be to date as a young Black woman.

Angela Bowden on yesterday’s sentencing of Shawn Wade Hynes. the white man who shot a staple gun at young Nhlanhla Dlamini: “Hynes’ crimes were cushioned by his best interests (potential rehabilitation and trauma), while it paid lip service to the actual trauma he caused his victim. I wonder why Shawn Hynes’ character was granted the benefit of the doubt straight in the face of his clear anti-Blackness?”

The Nova Scotia College of Social Workers is inviting the broader community to join in re-imagining how we can collaboratively develop a social justice praxis that will ensure that every person can join in the recovery that is hopefully around the corner. Nadia Siritsky writes about some of the topics the conference aims to cover, including the keynote from Dr. Delores Mullings, Associate Professor at Memorial University, questioning the popular framing of white fragility.