Thursday, 23 May 2019

This weekend’s Weekend Video, Me too: From hashtags to healing, features some of the expert sexual assault trauma therapists who work for the Avalon Sexual Assault Centre, talking about their backgrounds and the very important work they do. 

In 1965, prior to the construction of the Boat Harbour treatment facility, the Nova Scotia Water Authority, representing the provincial government, assured upset members of the Pictou Landing First Nation that the lagoon would remain suitable for boating, and even that fresh-water fish could be introduced. The only time there would be a bit of a smell would be in spring as the ice in the lagoon was breaking up, community members were told.

Two clips this weekend, to highlight two film festivals happening this week, one a mini one, the other a full blown festival, and both with an excellent line up. Kampung Tapir, a 17-minute short from Indonesia/Malaysia about migration, is part of this Tuesday’s screening presented by Mayworks’ Canadian Labour International Film Festival. Next we present a trailer for the full length Singing to Myself, about a young deaf woman living in Prince Edward Island and the precocious musician who comes into her life. That is one of the many gems offered by the Bluenose-Ability Film Festival, running from November 29 to December 3rd.  

This weekend’s weekend video features Halifax musician, photographer, stalwart activist and Nova Scotia Advocate author Paul Vienneau as he hands out bottled water on a hot Spring Garden day. ““This helped me see that giving away water has become part of what I am doing with my life. It’s an antidepressant in 24 little plastic bottles.”

Recent King’s journalism graduates Tundé Balogun and  Sandra Hannebohm want to cover news that traditional media in Nova Scotia overlook. To do so, they have founded the Objective, an independent news agency that will cover Black news in Nova Scotia and beyond. Check out the trailer for their first project, a work in progress about the school-to-prison pipeline for Black kids here in Nova Scotia. Please support Tundé and Sandra and help them finish the documentary. It’s important.

Just last week it was announced that the AGNS acquired kent Monkman’s large painting, Miss Chief’s Wet Dream, featuring Jesus Christ, Queen Victoria, Marie Antoinette, as well as Miss Chief Testickle, Monkman’s gender-fluid alter ego. This weekend’s video celebrates that acquisition, and I also use it to plug the wonderful Monkman exhibition up now, and running til mid-December, and especially also a collective viewing this Thursday evening organized by MLA Lisa Roberts. Thursday nights are free at the AGNS.

Check out this weekend’s Weekend video, We story the land, a documentary by the always excellent Martha Stiegman (and co-produced and directed by Sherry Pictou) that follows seven paddlers from L’sitkuk (Bear River First Nation) as they travel inland following almost forgotten traditional Mi’kmaq canoe routes. It’s really good.

Everything you should know about gold mining in Nova Scotia, the harm it does to the environment and the politicians who make it all possible, in this very good documentary by Cliff Seruntine.

This weekend’s weekend video is Missing Women”, based on a stunning poem by Mad poet and filmmaker Anna Quon. The poem lists some of the ways women have gone missing from history, culture and their own lives, and names some of those women and girls to help us remember them. You really should watch this.